When someone else’s memories cost you 22 dollars

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The first garage sale house of the day , isn’t that a lovely maple

Hi All,

Fran is very busy today so I am posting the photos and captions for them ok so its my fault not hers 🙂

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Garage sale dogs like junk yard dogs but they are after the junk 🙂

What is it about “artefacts” that makes us curious and want to fossick around? It’s the same thing that has us wanting to pull up the collective psychiatrists couch whenever people reminisce and say “tell us more…” Today’s post is all about “What I got at The Progressive Garage Sale” a small thesis of less than (I PROMISE) 2800 words but my introduction is about the value of collective memories and how important they are to society as a whole (and that, I am reserving for my REAL thesis! 😉 ). I got a memo that my sister Pinky of http://cathyandchucky.com/ blogging fame had posted another post. I love using an RSS Feed Reader; it does all the hard work for me and keeps my email account free of post reminders. In her latest post she shared a magnificent chunky lamb shank soup that she has been making for many years. I remember the torn out page from the Australian woman’s weekly magazine that she took the recipe from being carefully folded up and covered in indeterminate stains. I wrote the recipe out myself because this soup is a winner. The mug that she used for her soup was one of the enormous mugs that I used for my (buckets) cups of tea while we chatted. Pictures and “things” are what memories are made of.

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This is where we bought our computer throne from a few years ago (see past posts)

In saying that, I just bought a stack of past and future “memories”.  I paid $22 Aussie dollars for a whole stack of other people’s memories that I can only begin to wonder about. Our adventure began a few weeks ago when we remembered that pretty soon the annual progressive garage sale would be upon us for another year. We stumbled across the very first on 2 years ago when we were heading out to walk the dogs. If it wasn’t for the very first progressive garage sale, we wouldn’t have Big Yin and his original cohorts. We bought them as teeny little chicks and today they are the equivalent of Somalian pirates on Serendipity Farm…no sooner do you set foot outside the safety of your back gate and attempt to navigate the high seas of Serendipity Farm then you are set upon by wayfaring pirates attempting to rob you of everything of worth. The first year we spent a fair bit at the progressive garage sale. There were lots of vendors and plenty of bargains to be had and our chooks (8 in all) added to the cost. Last year we spent $27 and ended up with a higgledy piggledy mass of “stuff” to delight my hoarding heart. This year we spend $22 and despite the few vendors who had decided to take part we were still able to arrive back home laden with goodies

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Fran caught unawares by my lens 🙂

We had contacted the lovely Lisa of obvious Scottish heritage who runs the Artisan gallery and who appears to be the poor lost soul that got stuck with organising this massive event each year. Last year she had a list of garage sales that you could print out and head directly to with a short list of what they were offering. This year she was a bit savvier and only gave the list out on Friday evening. The problem is that here in Tassie we have more than our fair share of “traders”…markets, antique sellers and general EBay vultures who like to predate garage sales, auctions and house clearance sales with a view to robbing them blind and making the maximum profit. They descend on garage sales 2 hours before the assigned time and try to get the very best for the very cheapest. Vendors are sick to death of them but they are like seagulls at the tip, unfortunately inevitable.

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What a lovely garden this is in autumn

This year, a group of local Kayena dwellers decided to tag onto the end of the garage sale and we headed up to check it out. I managed to get an Italian glass litre wine carafe for $1 that I am now using for my homemade non-dairy milk. I also bought a stainless steel teapot/jug, a copy of a wonderful Permaculture book and a 1971 “Mrs Beeton’s cookbook in colour” for 50c each. I noticed a stone bottle that now lives in Steve’s room for $1 and I got about 10kg of various types of apples for $3. All in all a very good start to the day. I decided that if we didn’t get anything else in the entire garage sale, this one stop was worth driving to. Aside from getting some great bargains, we met the man that bought my brothers property over in Kayena and who owns the local school bus route. He and his wife are very nice people and he told me that whenever I fancy some horse or cow manure, I just had to call and he would let me collect as much as I like! Considering this man owns most of the farmland in Sidmouth, Rowella and Kayena (along with a share in the local dairy) I figure the supply might just be big enough for my aspirations! ;). Apparently the vultures had turned up to this garage sale at 7.30…sigh…

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This is all the house the chair came from , its nice eh

We continued on to the next garage sale at Iron Pot Bay winery. We arrived at 8.55am and slowly walked down the driveway to be met by an irate elderly man who told us in no uncertain terms to “PISS OFF!” We thought that he was joking at first, but after he told us that “This bloody garage sale doesn’t start till 9am!” and I said “Ok…so we will just wait here then…” and he said “no you bloody well won’t! You can head right back up that driveway quick smart!”…O…K…SOMEONE woke up on the wrong side of the bed! I dare say the vultures had been predating since 7am and this elderly gentleman had just about had enough! Steve wasn’t in the mood to be garage saling at this residence after our less than lukewarm welcome so we headed off to the next stop post haste!

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not sure why the time is this but it must mean something to the owners

We arrived at the next garage sale (after checking that it was AFTER 9am…fool us once! 😉 ) where we got my blackwood throne (my computer chair) for $2 last year and managed to score a large cray pot for $5 and a wonderful wrought iron old single bed head for $2. We couldn’t take them with us because we had the dogs with us (they were “supposedly” behaving and we would take them to the beach as a reward for all of the stops…) and so I waved goodbye to my bargains and Steve was going to head back to pick them up after dropping us at home after we had finished garage saling and walking the dogs. The rest of the garage sales seemed to be condensed into a single neighbourhood and we walked to most of them. I could hear a grumpy man armed with what must have been most of the garage sale that we were heading to saying to his wife “she TOLD me I could have it for $5!”… It would seem that the antique brass plaque that he was toting might have cost him a teensy bit more? Oh how TERRIBLE sir? 😉

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Liquid ambers at there best

I was more interested in taking photos of the delicious autumn colours than I was in hunting. I was already more than happy with the bargains that we had bought and by the time we arrived at the Deviot Hall we met Jenny, our friend from the bush who had just found a small folding table and 2 enormous wisteria poles for a bargain price. She was going one way…we were going the other and so we headed off to see what was still on offer at either end of the spectrum. After finding a few more small bargains including a nice stainless steel “Coffee” canister that now contains my tea-bags (tea thieves beware!) we headed off to the beach much to the relief of Earl and Bezial who were WELL over our ridiculous need to stop and start every 5 minutes when it was more than obvious we were headed to “THE BEACH!”

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Pretty house isn’t it

By the time we got to said beach, the dogs were overexcited and practically jumped into the front with us before we stopped the car. We had a lovely “drag” around Paper Beach and I collected some lovely smooth beach pebbles. We might not have lovely white sand like the beaches in Western Australia (or the East coast of Tassie for that matter…) but what we lack in pristine white, we make up for in gorgeous smooth pebbles and rocks. Swings and roundabouts…  I have been surreptitiously collecting the odd pebble here and there whenever we walk on the beach and put them in my potted plants and dot them around our home. I am a quintessential reformed pack rat who has a need to collect. I try to give away as much as I collect now to redress the balance quotient but the need is still strong in this (not so) young padawan.

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Wish our drive was like this oh and that’s our cray pot in the shot 😉

We arrived home triumphant and while I took photos and then put our bargains to work for us Steve headed back to pick up our craypot and bed head. The craypot is not situated on our deck stairs and the bedhead is going to become an ornate gate down in the garden dividing one secret garden from the next. The only thing that hasn’t quite found a place to live yet is a small watercolour painting that I picked up for $2. I just liked it. Someone had gifted this original artwork to someone else and it has an inscription on the back…more memories that obviously weren’t all that important any more. Time to create some new memories with my bargains and take them off on another tangent on Serendipity Farm and as most of them won’t be being used for the purpose for which they were created; at least they will get a second chance in the great memories sweepstakes

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colours of nature are so bright

It’s raining on Serendipity Farm. Nothing unexpected about rain in autumn but this is our first real rainy day in ages and it came smack bang on the day that we were all going to head into the city to accomplish an amazing array of “stuff”…does anyone else get the feeling that someone out there has a great sense of humour? ;). The dogs are now sulking because they were expecting to go to town and have a ball and I am sulking because “I” was expecting to go to town and have a ball but in the end, the trailer got disconnected and poor Steve had to go to town and do everything himself. There are benefits in that he will be back a good 3 hours before we would have otherwise been back and when he gets in, I can take over putting things away, unloading groceries and dividing up the dogs meat into meal sized portions for the freezer. As carbon savvy consumers we tend not to use our car much these days. We walk the dogs locally most of the time and only use the car if we need to go further afield than our 2 feet are willing to take us. A 100km round trip is out of the question and so sulking dogs and a less than impressed “Fran” remain at home.

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More hunters

Steve will be pricing up timber for making 2 custom low seating units either side of Brunhilda. We don’t want to waste space and are designing wood storage into these units. They will be predominately for the dogs to use as beds over winter but will be great for stretching out and reading a book on our cold days. This rain might have forced me indoors but it is also soaking the rock hard soil where we need to dig holes and will make our job tomorrow a whole lot easier. Steve and I have trepidations about digging holes on Serendipity Farm. We know, from past experience, that digging a “hole” is a whole lot harder than it might initially sound. Our soil is littered with rocks of various sizes and 20cm down we have solid yellow clay that you could make pots out of. It’s probably what has kept us on track with our studies…we had 2 choices…”study” or “dig a hole”…studying won! ;). We can’t put it off any longer and as founding members of the Serendipity Farm procrastinators society we have both agreed (after a few cups of tea, hanging a load of washing out, baking some biscuits and tinkering around in the shed…) to get stuck into digging some holes. Once the holes are dug it will be somewhat smooth sailing, it’s just the digging of the holes that has us twitching.

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Apparently these people camped out in anticipation lol

I have 35 photos to share with you all today so I might just leave this post a little shorter than usual. I am going to head off now and do something positive with the rest of my morning before Steve gets back home. I might do some dusting…the spiders have been getting cheeky lately and I think it is time to remind them that we have a mutual agreement…I let them eat our flies and they keep their webs to the corners of the room…I noticed one festooned across the ceiling yesterday so time to make the advancing hoards retreat! See you all on Wednesday folks :o)

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Some spoils of the hunt

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Treasure and some nice apples

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22$ can go a long way

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Ahh crays ahead

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This will become a gate one day soon

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Apparently I like pot ….

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Finally finished and Bezials happy

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A very pretty vine on our way to the beach

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Beach stones Fran loves stones

A Fracoon is eating my library books!

Hi All,

My daughters took one look at our new pup a year ago and said “It’s a Fracoon”. A fracoon is apparently a cross between “Redd Fox” from the Nintendo game Animal Crossing and a racoon. Earl has proven to be a worthy combination of the two. Redd Fox was a dubious ‘merchant’ in the game and whenever you bought something from his nefarious shop, you were always aware that it might not be quite kosher (if you get my drift) and ran the risk of being ridiculed for buying a fake. Foxes are nefarious creatures that slink around looking for something to eat or some trouble to get into and raccoon’s reputations precede them. They are gregarious, brave, inquisitive and little demolition derbies on wheels, much like our Aussie brush tail possums. Earl is all of the above in a much bigger skin. Like foxes and racoons he has his cute moments. Earl isn’t a bad dog…he is a bored dog. Steve and I walk both dogs at least 5km a day which takes us over an hour. Bezial is fine with this and spends the rest of the day lounging around on the deck or moving from sunbeams to a bit of shade. Earl is another kettle of fracoons and we just have to amuse him throughout the day. I have foiled the library and have purchased a copy of “A Covenant with Death” by John Harris from an online second-hand book seller and it is winging its merry way across the Tasman as I type this post and once it arrives I will take it, along with the shredded remnants of a young dog’s inquisitiveness and face the music at the library. I have a sneaking suspicion that they are going to start suggesting library books to me. You know the kind…the tattered yellow dog-eared kind with more sticky tape on them than book because so far, the library has been coming out of the “Fracoon book cleansing” events on top. Earl’s first attempt was a hardly read copy of a hard cover book about edible food forests. It was replaced with a brand new copy sent out from old Blighty post haste. This second book was from the early 1960’s. Some might say “a 60’s book is a classic so would cost more to replace”. I would say “this book could be found for 20c at an op shop if I had the time and the ability to hunt through the shelves in Launceston” but I don’t and so the online option where the book was actually removed from someone’s market stall at the Melbourne Markets had to be effected. This book is shiploads better than the copy that Earl segmented and so again…the library comes out on top. I hope that Earl (and I) have learned our lessons now. Library books are NOT worth eating or leaving anywhere that fracoons can find them.

This is the very first Garage Sale house for us. We started at the opposite side of the run of houses and were going the opposite way to just about everyone else. The story of our lives! Doesn’t this place look more like Vermont than Australia? Steve got his backpack sprayer here. Perfect for seasol, worm tea etc.

Garage sale number 2 and the start of a trend for various kinds of boats for sale. We even saw an unattended boat on the side of the road with a “For Sale” sign on it…

“The Others”… Have any of you seen a U.K. show called Mr Bean? In it, we can only assume an alien abducted (and rejected summarily) ausbergers man navigates his way through the “normal” world leaving an hilarious trail of debris behind him. There was an episode where he went on holiday and for some reason, singled out a man to compete with. This family are our “man” and we are playing the part (most magnificently I might add…) of Mr Bean. Brett and Sandy are locals that we know quite well. We don’t see them very often and usually only say hello to their dog Tommy while he is barking at us walking the dogs. We last saw them last year at the progressive garage sale where we rose victorious in our quest and bought the bargain of the day that is still spoken about in hallowed circles. Today we were chatting with them about how to defend yourself against marauding dogs when walking your dog on a lead. We said that we were going to buy a pair of telescopic walking poles from Ebay specifically for the purpose. Brett said “That’s a bloody good idea!” and as we both drove off in a cloud of dust it was on! later on they overtook us and we met them coming back the other way with a victorious Brett waving a telescopic ski pole out of the window saying “It only cost $3!”…Touche Brett and Sandy…Touche…for now! There’s always next year…

The next garage sale was a thinly veiled attempt to draw unsuspecting people in to a photographic gallery. We decided not to subject you to the pathetic items on display whilst the owner ushered us all into the gallery…we took photos of his goats instead. They were MUCH more interesting and attractive and I bet they were a heck of a lot cheaper! Goat 1

Goat 2

Steve and I have been working on one of our latest projects in our landscape design diploma. Today we will be making blocks in AutoCAD to place into our plan so that we can give our lecturer a “Concept Plan” for when we next see him. We have been looking online for concept plans to see if we can’t tailor AutoCAD to do what we want it to do because as technical and detailed as it is, it was never designed to be an artistic application and our results look unpolished. We discovered that many landscape designers use other, more artistic, applications but we are not in the position where we can pay for another computer program to make our plans “look pretty” at the moment so we are doing what we do best and thinking laterally. Studying from home allows us to make a whole lot of silly mistakes using AutoCAD and because our lecturer isn’t right here with us we pretty much mess about and see if we can’t solve our own problems before we send off a volley of “HELP” messages to his inbox. We often come up with solutions that our lecturer might not otherwise have had to deal with and so we learn more about what we are doing than we would otherwise do if we were sitting in a classroom of students watching the board. Studying from home is really great for us. For the first 18 months of our horticultural adventure we had to attend class daily. We lived 4km from the city centre at the time and had just signed up for our diploma in horticulture when my dad died suddenly and everything changed. We moved from 4km away from the city to 50km away from the city. Because we were penniless hippy students we were unaware how our inheritance of 2 houses would affect our student payments and so we spent the rest of 2010 cramming in as many units (5 in all) as we could (the most expensive units in the diploma) to ensure that we wouldn’t have to pay full price for these units the year after. Tasmania’s low priced houses allowed us to keep both houses and still fulfil our student payment obligations and so life didn’t suddenly become massively complicated and we were able to move here and carry on studying as we had before. We are so very glad that we had been studying horticulture because without that lifesaving backbone we would still be huddled under the bed hiding from the massive vegetative problem we inherited. We are using our property for our sustainable landscape design. It’s given us a degree of personal satisfaction to use what we already know and supplement it with permaculture principals using information gleaned from as many of the incredibly generous people out there who live a permaculture life and who are willing to share their trials and tribulations with the rest of us. We learn from their mistakes and are able to use their hard work to our avail. One day we will help community groups to design outdoor spaces that suit them using what we have learned. We hope to barter our way through life as we turn Serendipity Farm into our own personal little oasis of permaculture bliss. I dare say I won’t be writing “The Serendipity Farm Little Book of Calm” any day soon, but things are starting to feel like they are working together around here for the first time in almost 2 years. Cycles are starting to integrate and we can see a light at the end of this most chaotic of tunnels. We are growing our own nut trees, fruit trees, edible fruiting shrubs and as much as we can to help us to turn this property into an edible food forest for the native animals and for us. Our lecturer is jaded about country living. No doubt he was once a bright eyed bushy tailed (sorry Nick…I just made you sound like one of your arch nemesis possums there!) horticulturalist out to save the world but things wear you down and the native wildlife here is most persistent. Wonderful ideals can come tumbling down or can be worn down slowly until their shell is as smooth as a cynical rock. I don’t blame him for being sceptical about our food forest idea. It’s easy to throw ideas around like Earl throws feathers from one of his plucked victims but I never do anything by halves. I have a burning need to research things and find the best possible outcome and one day, we will be able to live with the possums, indeed, they, being the territorial little bully bruisers that they are, will do our work for us. One family will rule them all and will keep the rest from scavenging everything that grows and there will be so much food here that one family won’t be able to eat it all. That’s my aim and over the next few years we will see if I end up victorious or jaded. Either way my stubborn willpower won’t allow us not to have our edible food forest. It might just look like a Steampunk garden covered in old smooth metal and strange gnarled structures designed to minimise damage by the natives. Either way we will have a garden worth visiting.

The outside of the Deviot Hall, the recipient of the proceeds of the garage sale fees today.

This startled looking lady was a stallholder inside the hall. I bought a pair of Dutch canisters from here. The canisters were for “Suiker” and “Koffie”…

This most suspicious man seems to be in quite a few of my photographs. It’s lucky that he was standing right there in front of this large Eucalyptus viminalis. As you can probably guess, this next garage sale was not all that photogenic…

We purchased a most interesting “lion” at this house. At least we THINK it is a lion…it was only $2 and a fitting plaything for the boys to dismember after our day out hunting for bargains

It’s just on dawn and I can hear Little Red (rooster) Big Yin’s first male progeny giving it the old college try outside and alerting me to stop typing and get his bread chopped. Steve and the dogs are still in bed. I like having an hour to myself in the morning and no sooner do I get out of bed than Bezial (who vacates the bed in the night) is waiting wagging his tail to hop into my nice warm patch and be covered over by the doona. I take Steve in a cup of coffee at 7 and we work out what we are going to do with our day. Today we will be walking the dogs early and we will then design some blocks for our concept plan in AutoCAD and after that we are going to cut a path through the weeds at the side of the house from the steps to where we have our potted plants around the side. We have been wondering why we haven’t done this sooner but we tend to flit around from project to project on Serendipity Farm to keep us motivated and this project has been on the back burner in the “not important or not dire” pile. Up to now we haven’t had the luxury of choosing, we have had to tackle the weed problem, the grass problem and the firewood problem as matters of importance. We DON’T want a fine from council for being a fire risk, we don’t want to perpetuate the weed problem that we have here and spread it to our neighbours (any more than it already is…) and we don’t want to be cold in winter so we needed to deal with those fundamentals first. Now we have the relative luxury of being able to choose and this pathway is one of our first choices because it will mean that we don’t have to walk 150metres to reach somewhere that is actually 10 metres away, just totally inaccessible thanks to tangled and massed vegetation. It will make our lives a bit easier and I am all for that!

I might only have bought a freaky handmade lion (that has since gone to meet its maker) but I fell instantly in love with this tiny bulldozer! Nothing would give me jip if I had this little baby on the property…not rocks…weeds…Earl…NOTHING would stop me! It’s just a pity it wasn’t for sale…

Many houses in Tasmania have apple packing sheds on the property. Tasmania is predominately an apple growing state and this old packing shed only opens once a year for this garage sale. I bought an Inkle loom and some world music CD’s from here last year and this year I bought a double disc DVD of Bill Grainger (an Australian Cook for everyone out of the loop) for $1. I just really love these steps…

And this bit…

And this bit too! See you next year Apple Packing shed…

Isn’t this ornamental grape lovely? That black coated woman in the background is me attempting to get Steve to think about letting me have some old wooden doors and a window sill for $5 each. We didn’t end up getting them and thank goodness because I have NO idea why I wanted them!

We made a few blocks, we cleared out a pathway and as we usually do, we were not content to leave it at that and headed off tackling blackberries with our swashbuckling secateurs and our trusty small pruning saw. We lopped 15ft tall roses that should never have ventured above 5ft, we removed enormous boneseed plants, weeds from South Africa (as are most Aussie invasive weeds because they LOVE it here) and had to be very careful wherever we trod because the 3 latest silver laced Wyandotte babies and their 2 mums and Effel and her remaining 7 babies were everywhere! As usual, we managed to carve a way through the wilderness to make it easier for us to go from the steps to the potted plant area around the side of the house and in the process generated 3 trailer loads of debris (mostly boneseed, blackberries and enormously overgrown Buddleia davidii). Once we removed the overgrown Buddleia shrubs on the side of the deck we opened up a newfound gap in our Earl proof garden defences and we had to fix it up post haste! Earl had a bit of a nibble on the new fortification and decided that the taste and texture of thick weldmesh are not something that he is going to ingest any day soon. Owners 1, Earl nil. The petition that I started on Avaaz a few weeks ago when foaming at the mouth (a regular occurrence for me whenever I watch, listen or become aware of “news” in general) at a news bulletin about our state leader telling us how we NEED that (bloody) pulp mill for Tasmania’s future…eh?! If we are relying on it, Tasmania is totally bollocked as far as I am concerned. I no sooner settled down (still foaming and muttering) to the PC when I noticed a post from Kosmos9, a blog that I follow, sharing a site where normal people can make a difference by starting a petition. I threw myself into it with great gusto and set about transferring all of that froth and angst and frustration into that petition. I got an email from one of the Avaaz volunteers who is an Aussie living in Sweden and who helped me reformulate the petition into a smaller, more condensed (less foam and more meat ;)) petition and now the petition has been noticed by most of the local anti-pulp mill groups and it went from 10 signature’s to just on 400 in one day! I hope EVERYONE signs this petition. We are unable to get the media to be unbiased regarding this matter and so those of us who don’t want this mill (most of Tasmania’s population) are simply ignored and don’t have a voice. We are told blatant lies in the media that we can’t counteract because we are stifled whenever we try to have our voices heard. One can only think that the media in Tasmania is bought and paid for by big business along with both major political parties in our state. This petition was my one way of sharing my angst with the rest of the world and it looks like the rest of the world is actually starting to listen! Cheers to anyone reading this blog who has signed my petition. You are giving us back our voice and a degree of hope that we might be able to do something about this injustice. There are over 500 signatures for the petition now and growing (hopefully exponentially).

When we pulled up in the driveway of this house there was a little covered stand loaded up with jonquil bulbs, enormous organic grapefruit and small sage and chive plants in recycled newspaper pots for “donations to the famine in Africa”. I knew that I was just about to meet some kindred spirits and on meandering down their driveway and seeing this totem pole, it bolstered my opinion of them no end. It also gave Steve the idea of making his own totem pole

This is a permaculture garden with a large almond tree in the centre and various annuals and perenials as well as edible plants and vegetables. The owners told me that they wanted to reach an eventuality where they had minimal human input with the garden. Good luck with that guys 🙂

I just loved this little gargoyle on that stump. It personified exactly how I feel sometimes when I head out into the garden and have to start thinking about where to get stuck in…

I didn’t like the woman running this garage sale. She was somewhat snooty and very overpriced so I headed out to where she actually had something interesting and took a photo of this possum fortified veggie garden combined with a chook house and a weather vane. I really appreciated her chook yard…I didn’t appreciate her!

Heres the other side of the chook jail with a wistful rooster peeking out…

We got up bright and early this morning to go to the annual progressive garage sale that we went to last year totally by accident. We were heading somewhere with our trailer when we noticed the garage sale sign and found out that lots of houses were involved. It’s a great idea and allows everyone to sell off their unwanted items at the same time so they don’t have to pay for the publicity and there are more people out and about than might come for a single garage sale. We walked the boys early and packed them into the car with the lure of “walking at the beach”. For the next 2 hours we got in and out of the car and had to shove an ever more reluctant Earl into the back. I love garage sales and have the opinion that I don’t have to race from door to door because I might miss something (as many of the people we saw were doing) because if we were meant to get an item, it would be there for us. I took lots of photos to share with you whenever I could. We cashed up $50 into coins and smaller notes because there is nothing worse for someone having a garage sale than people wielding $50 notes. We still had $23 left when we got back and bought heaps of unique and interesting things and met some really interesting people. At the final garage sale I met a lady that I had met in the Exeter Library who had a common interest in sourdough bread making and she told me that she has just succeeded in making a great starter and is going to give me some! We found an amazing seed pod on a Eucalyptus conferruminata and its currently residing in the cooler of our 4 ovens so that we can see if we can get some seed from it. I had a really good time wandering around other people’s driveways and gardens and was more interested in what people were growing than in what was for sale! I got a most eclectic mix of items and am most happy with what we bought. Steve got a backpack sprayer from the very first garage sale that we went to for $5. It is a step up from the small spray pack that we are currently using that came with seasol when we purchased it. I love getting bargains and re-using things that other people no longer want. We bought a wonderful handmade wall tile for $2 with a wonderful representation of the sun on it that is now hanging out on our wall on the deck. At the end of the garage sale line we got to Paper Beach and it was blowing up a storm when we got the long suffering dogs out of the car. They won’t be in such a hurry to get into the car next time!

This was the last garage sale of the day and I loved this metal pelican statue. We skipped a few garage sales and I didn’t take photos of some of the others which is very lucky because otherwise this post would be bordering on a novella again wouldn’t it!

This is the flower of the Eucalyptus conferruminata that I mentioned earlier.

And the magnificent seed pod (my daughters who have just started reading these posts again are rolling their eyes and skipping over this bit saying “MORE PLANTS”…)

Sorry about the lack of focus on this spent flower bud but apparently my camera can only focus on the foreground OR the background and its the backgrounds turn this time…sigh…

And lastly the leaves of this most beautiful and interesting of Eucalypts

In keeping with my need to make my posts smaller I will finish up here for the day. Hi to Kelsey if you are reading this post. I was really glad to meet you and I hope you have a fantastic life changing holiday. To everyone else, have an awesome week and see you hump day…

Here are some of the bargains that we got… the 2 glasses cost a total of $1 and are hand blown glass and that reed thing on the right hand side is a pot with a handle from Papua New Guinea for my “reeds of the world” collection. I don’t really have a reeds of the world collection but apart from making me sound interesting, I might just have to start one now!

I met many interesting people while garage saling and Steve met a real fun guy…you can see him at the very front of the photo…fun guy…fungi oh come ON people! We all need a little lightness and laughter in our day 😉

1 small bargain for Fran and 1 great leap for the contents of Steve’s wallet

Hi All,

It’s market day! It’s also the day that we take Stewart into town to catch his plane over to Melbourne to go house hunting. Bonne chance Stewart and good luck to us in finding some extreme bargains at the markets. I have a list of things that I look for at markets. The list has been trimmed according to my changing tastes but there are a few core items that are always hunted for

  1. Terracotta kitchen ware
  2. Unusual vintage kitchenalia and interesting kitchenware especially bowls
  3. Weird and wonderful items especially musical instruments, ethnic “things” and items that fit in with our rustic beach-house theme
  4. Plants and interesting pots for plants and anything weird and wonderful for the garden
  5. Strange foodstuffs
  6. BARGAINS!

The last item is very important as sometimes I will buy something that I don’t need merely because it is a BARGAIN! I once tried to get Steve to buy 2 lawnmowers from the man up the street who was having a garage sale because he was only charging $10 each for them. BARGAIN! Steve is not easily swayed by something being a bargain…he is highly unlikely to listen to my protestations even when I am hopping from foot to foot (a good sign that I think something is an EXTREME BARGAIN rather than merely BARGAIN!) and is my constant leveller (and oftwhile miserly stingemeister!) when it comes to spending (he would say “wasting”…) money at markets. I must admit to buying things and once I get them home, they get put into a cupboard until I pack them up into a cardboard box, along with several of their fellow cupboard mates, and drop them off at the local thrift shop. I freely admit to enjoying the process of buying the bargain somewhat more than actually owning the bargain but in the thrill of the hunt, I often need Steve to remind me about the last BARGAIN! That I bought that I absolutely POSITIVELY had to have and that hasn’t seen the light of day since I bought it. Hopefully I find some really good BARGAINS and Steve allows me to purchase at least 1 of them to salve my poor overactive bargain brain synapses.

Here is one of the bargains that I got today. This little fellow has only survived so far because his friend (below) was much more interesting…

As you can see…this little man is a leg (and an eye) short of the full insect…

This was my 1 little bargain today. I missed out on a lovely cutting board for $1, but I already have lots of them so hopefully the lady that bought it is going to use it. I picked this nice little set of condiment bowls for $3. The stall that I bought them from had all sorts of bargains. There were all sorts of really nice cushions for $1. I knew better to buy any of them (no matter how much they screamed BARGAIN at me…) because all I had to do was put BARGAIN cushion + Earl together in my mind and I got more mess than I was willing to clean up no matter how cheap the original package was…

I can see these little bowls with lovely mixed marinated olives, a mix of marinated grilled vegetables and perhaps some home made tapenade or guacamole to accompany some lovely fresh crusty bread, a large bowl of mixed salad greens, some nice freshly made dressing and something grilled on the bbq. As far as I am concerned these had BARGAIN written all over them :o)

I think winter is here. Ever since we erected the overhead watering system (indeed it started raining the second that we turned the sprinkler system on for the 1st time…) it has been cooler and has rained pretty much every day. We are thinking of hiring our services out to arid regions and desert prone areas as “rain makers”. Who needs to shake sticks around and seed clouds…we just have to pull out some black poly pipe and a few sprinklers and the rain sets in hard. I have a sneaking suspicion that this sudden decent into winter has a lot to do with the fact that Festivale is on again in Launceston. Festivale is Launceston’s ultimate wank fest that encompasses old has been singers, top quality wine (no other kind is available apparently in Tasmania), degustation (can’t be just “grub” has to be something wanky), all kinds of “boutique”; “Slow food”; “Truffle infused” (Tasmanian truffles at that…); “Clean green” and any other cliché that can be pulled out and recycled from last year to generate a massive elevated profit from what usually gets washed out from the rain. “Festivale” is an anathema to me! It symbolifies everything that is wrong with Tasmania and with society as a whole. I totally understand that people need to make a profit for their hard work but sometimes people only buy something because it is so expensive that it phases out the riff-raff and this sort of audience is thick on the ground at Festivale. Good old Darryl Braithwaite of sad old Sherbet fame is singing along with Richard (NOT Eric) Clapton (of the “girls on the avenue” fame) and everyone will be sipping their chardonnay and Pinot out of plastic glasses that they will toss into the shrubs around City Park (that has been fenced off to keep the riff-raff out…) for “someone else” to deal with once Festivale is over and done with for another year. I hate wankers. I can’t stand people that want to elevate themselves above everyone else for any reason. Pretentious people are an ugly blight on the potato of life and should be scraped off as soon as possible for the good of all mankind.

Meet Henry (of the Rollins’ variety) the rooster. We are quite sure that this is a rooster. He hasn’t actually crowed yet but he changed colour from pure black to this more interesting colour and is much bigger than most of the other chooks. He is most interested in humans and what they are up to. He is interested because humans = food and wherever they are, there tends to be some sort of grub so Henry follows me around (the provider of most of the food that gets thrown to the chooks) and he decided that as we were spending an inordinate amount of time outside messing about with the trailer (moving plants around to the other side of the house under the new overhead sprinkler system) that there must be some form of grub hidden in that big shiny thing somewhere…sorry Henry, nothing to eat here!

Here you can see 2 dogs that are now able to be walked together by 1 person. Bezial is well aware of what this thing over his nose is (a loss of his freedom) but to Earl, this is all very new. The photo after this one (blurred as it was) showed Earl with his nose down and looking like someone had eaten his dinner. Humans 1; Dogs nil…

We dropped a box of “stuff” off at the Beaconsfield Thrift shop the other day. Thrift shops are like markets to me. I love recycling and buying recycled things. Where once purchasing items from Thrift shops was looked down upon, it is now a place that you can find people from all walks of life bottoms up hunting through boxes, shelves and racks. Vintage clothing sellers…people hunting for items to on-sell on eBay…people with market stalls…genuine bargain hunters (like me) and “Indie kids” who roam in packs to bolster their street cred. Thrift shops, recycling centres, tip shops and various other businesses that have sprung from people’s desire to tread more lightly on the planet are now big business and people are taking pride from buying recycled items and giving them new life. I had a bit of a hunt through the thrift shop and bought a toy for the dogs and a very old (probably 50’s/60’s) rubber squeaky toy that I was going to give to the dogs but decided against because it is so very old. I have no idea why I didn’t give this lump of rubber to the dogs to dissect apart from feeling guilty because it is probably older than I am and it is such a shame to turn it into dog dung when it has survived until now despite being something that usually gets thrown out. It will be stuck into a cupboard somewhere until I take it to another thrift shop or perhaps I will sell it on eBay (if I can negotiate my way around all of the other seller’s hell bent on ripping everyone off…). EBay used to be somewhere you could get bargains. The online thrift shop of great happiness and indeed, my daughters spend a good proportion of their ready income on eBay purchases from all over the world. The mailmen must sit around the mailroom taking bets about where their next parcel will come from. They have bought Icelandic candy, clothes from Singapore, videos and D.V.D.’s from the U.K. and all sorts of products from America. I have bought a fair bit on eBay also but after a long hiatus I decided to have a bit of a look-see and was horrified to find that you now have to wade your way through Chinese sellers masquerading as Australian sellers. I like to support our local sellers and as such I select “Australia only” to filter out other countries. Nefarious Chinese sellers have decided to rort this system by listing themselves as “Country of origin – Australia” and no-one is checking up on them. Far from being somewhere to find a bargain, eBay is now a genuine rip off and somewhere where overpriced rubbish is dumped on an unsuspecting public. I don’t think I will be buying much from eBay any more. It’s sad really, it had real promise but even with the time on our hands that we are able to spare I couldn’t be bothered sifting through the piles of cheap overpriced garbage to find the few items of worth any more…

I thought I might take a few pictures of Evandale for you. Its a pretty town about 5 minutes away from the Launceston Airport. We headed there today as we just dropped a newly refreshed and ready to embark on his new life Stewart off to catch his early flight to Melbourne. The Evandale Markets are a great place to check for bargains and pick up some really good fresh veggies should you ever be out that way. We walked the boys afterwards and I took some photos to show you how pretty this little Tasmanian town is

Evandale is full of old buildings with stately gardens. It’s a great place to start when you want to work out how to give your garden a formal touch. Lots of conifers of all shapes and sizes and a really good use of shrubs.

This is the community centre

Another pretty old house with some lovely clipped hedges and a pair of large cedrus

This is an old water tower, once the source of Evandale’s water and now a nice tourist attraction

It’s raining…it’s coincidentally still Festivale…I wonder if tomorrow (when it is all over and some poor council worker is dragging a bin around attempting to extract hundreds of plastic glasses from various shrubs in City Park) will be a lovely sunny day? One case of Murphy’s Law that makes me smile. I forgot to mention that Saturday was “The fishing tourney”. That might not mean ANYTHING to most of you but it meant that I spent some of Saturday (while Steve and Stewart were watching television AFTER playing Mario Kart as I needed the Wii to play…) attempting to catch the biggest fish on Animal Crossing. Never let it be said that I am unable to fill my day with meaningful and important tasks. When I reach the pearly gates, I might not be able to list “Brain surgeon”, “philanthropist” or “life saver” in my list of attributes, but St Peter and I can have a really good natter about how big my Sea Bass (or Carp…depending on whether we are river or sea fishing…) was. At least I am off the streets and confined to Serendipity Farm which most of you should be quite grateful for :o) I am alternating between reading and playing Animal Crossing. Both Steve and I can’t help but feel like we should be doing “something”. It is past the time when we usually start Polytechnic classes for the year but with the recent upheaval (thanks to our useless state government who sold us out for 15 pieces of silver (stupid to the end!) and who have just decided to take their 15 pieces of silver back from the health system, the police force and most pertinently the education system) in the Polytechnic system our course hasn’t even been listed yet and so we have to wait until it is so that we can sign up for it. We are getting a bit stir crazy at the moment and want to get back to our regular routine. Both Steve and I dislike change and love a good routine. That might make us sound boring but we don’t have time to worry about how boring we sound, we need that stability and process to keep us heading in the right direction.  Today has been a most enjoyable finish to a week. The weather has fined up and is sunny, windy and about 22C. How lucky are we to live in this lovely place? The rest of the afternoon is ours to enjoy as we see fit. Tomorrow we might potter around in the garden for a bit and see if we can’t do a bit more tidying up. Depending on the weather we might do some lumberjacking and chainsaw some more firewood towards winter. It’s great to have a bit of choice about what we can do and when we want to do it. Whatever we choose to do tomorrow its a brand new day full of all sorts of possiblities and you can be sure that we will take full advantage of what we have been given :o) See you all then…

Isn’t this a really great mailbox?

We are thinking about making these ourselves for our market stall. One thing that we have an endless supply of on Serendipity Farm is small branches! If we used them to make mailboxes, it would save us having to spend time and effort to burn them and might even make us a bit of spare change. A win-win situation for sure

Isnt this a lovely Brachychiton populnea? The bottle trunk is developing well and its canopy is nice and green and well structured. Not bad for something from Northern Queensland living in Evandale where it regularly drops below 0C in winter is it? We have 2 of these on our property and we sourced some seed from a lovely specimen in City Park in the middle of Launceston so they seem to quite like it down this way

I will just finish off with 2 photos of a lovely old weatherboard house in Evandale that obviously houses a family of Penny Farthing riders. Evandale is well known for holding a Penny Farthing race all around the houses once a year and there are many Penny Farthing riders living and actively cycling their way around Evandale on a regular basis.

You all know how I feel about bike riding, but if I was forced to ride one of these Penny Farthings I think I would settle for that little trike at the back :o)