Going to Montana to raise me a crop of dental floss…

Hi All,

As whacked out and strange as he was, I love me a bit of Frank Zappa. Here’s a most poignant discourse about mainstream education that rings most true…

“Schools train people to be ignorant, with style. They give you the equipment that you need to be a functional ignoramus. American schools do not equip you to deal with things like logic; they don’t give you the criteria by which to judge between good and bad in any medium or format; and they prepare you to be a usable victim for military-industrial complex that needs manpower.”

“As long as you’re just smart enough to do a job and just dumb enough to swallow what they feed you, you’re gonna be alright. But if you go beyond that then you’re gonna have these grave doubts that give you stomach problems, headaches…make you want to go out and do something else. So, I believe that schools mechanically and very specifically try and breed out any hint of creative thought in the kids that are coming out.”

– Frank Zappa

 

Thinking about how next year we might just have to attend TAFE a few days a week and having to get my head around getting back into learning by rote and sitting down and behaving all over again. Not all that used to forced learning and we are quite used to studying when we like these days so this is going to be a difficult situation for this little black duck to bear.

Ducky loves fresh water , look at her go :)

Ducky loves fresh water , look at her go 🙂

Ms Pauline http://paulinekingblog.wordpress.com/2014/10/07/sometimes-i-sits-and-thinks/ has been talking about magic and bringing it back into our lives. This year I am dabbling in my own kind of magic alchemy of seed raising. The process from tiny dormant seed to big beautiful plant of purest green is the stuff that narfs wizardly dreams are made of. I have, prior to now, only bought post magic seeds and beanstalks for my annual garden but this year…THIS YEAR I am working my magic horticultural wand and I am attempting to magically coax life from tiny seeds so I planted out some seedlings. Yes, I did plant okra. I planted it because it is pretty much guaranteed to grow, has pretty flowers that the bees love and predominately because I tried it once and found it lacking. I am the sort that likes to give everything a second try just in case the first try was aberrant so yes…I am growing okra. I am also going to give Roselle’s a go and have planted out some purple artichoke seeds. I know that others are planting out peanuts and I am going to give them a go as well. I am not entirely sure as to how they will go here in farthest flung antipodean Tasmania but even if they fail, they are nitrogen fixing legumes so at least the soil will be better off after planting them even if I don’t get much of a yield. A cover crop with benefits…

Now we have a issue with a Kurrajong …

He is getting to cocky and likes cheese to much.

He is getting to cocky and likes cheese to much.

 

Emm cheese

Emm cheese

 

Jan, our friend who is just about to head off to Germany in the next 3 weeks, just gave me a large bag of vegetable, herb and flower seeds. Some of them date back to last century but I am going to give them a go. One of the bags looks like it predates me and is for something called Borecole, an old world name for kale. The manufacturer is one “Chas. Creswell & Co.” from Hobart Tasmania. I am going to give these seeds the old college try. I would love to think that something so old could still be vital and how amazing if they grow! The seed growing bug has me by the throat at the moment. I need to make some more seed raising mix but my last batch saw me institute a huge wooden splinter under my left middle finger nail while I was mixing in the ingredients by hand. It almost reached the quick of my nail and after liberal applications of peroxide to make sure it didn’t get infected after I pulled out the splinter, it has just about healed. I am loath to mix anything by hand till it is completely healed so am working on converting an old blender that we have (and don’t use) to the purpose. We have some amazing “black gold” compost that will be perfect for the job and I need to pick up some coconut coir peat to lighten it up enough to keep the seeds moist and the mix friable.

Just haveing a stroll on the deck are we..

Just haveing a stroll on the deck are we..

I picked up some chives in a pot for $2 from the lady who has a little plant stall at the top of a steep hill. I consider it my reward to buy a plant from the stall for having to walk the dogs up there when they are bored of our usual walks. I have picked up chocolate mint, various day lilies, dahlias etc. from this little stall and you just never know what might appear there on any given day so it’s wise to keep a regular eye on it and for only $2, walking up the hill is almost worthwhile. The weather has been a bit hit and miss of late but now that the glasshouse has been sorted out I can mess about propagating and planting to my heart’s content even if it is pouring down outside.

What happened here?

What happened here?

We have mystic eggs that roll on  there own i think ...

We have mystic eggs that roll on there own i think …

Steve and I finished the doors into Sanctuary through the side of the shed and now we can back the trailer up with loads of horse manure, seaweed, oak leaves and grass clippings and anything else that we can think of that will compost down well to deliver directly into Sanctuary. Prior to this, we would have to wheelbarrow loads of ingredients in through the door which up until yesterday, was a serious obstacle course to walk, let alone push a wheelbarrow into. Our entire property is on a steep incline and whenever it rains, the resulting water flows down with impunity. Part of Sanctuary is a quagmire and the problem is that it was the part where you have to walk in to get inside. We have a heap of spent horse manure inside the new compound area that needs to be transferred into Sanctuary but we simply had no way of delivering it inside aside from in buckets. I love the idea of having horse manure in my garden but shovelling it into buckets and carrying them back and forth up a steep slope? Not so much…

Oii there my eggs you know

Oii there my eggs you know

 

Blood moon , it was very cool to watch it

Blood moon , it was very cool to watch it

One i took before the blood moon started

One i took before the blood moon started

So we decided to take the bull by the horns and make a concrete path and ramp to bypass the mud. We discovered that the mud is the kind that squelches and sucks wellington boots off and the kind that Earl has to tip-toe over so we are also going to tip a trailer load of larger blue metal stones into the area where we are storing water in Blue barrels so that the mud stays under the rocks and doesn’t take over. Yesterday we decided it was perfect conditions to make the ramp and we spent most of the day shovelling concrete mix, concrete dust and water into a wheelbarrow and wheeling it up a steep incline into Sanctuary where Earl decided that he was both going to escape through the gate as we were shovelling and barrowing and make sure that he left his mark in the concrete. We gave up on trying to stop Earl leaving his paw prints in the concrete but were most steadfast in preventing him from escaping. 1 out of 2 aint bad Earl!

Cool whats this grey mud pa ? is it good for my little paws?

Cool whats this grey mud pa ? is it good for my little paws?

 

Oh i like the feel of this can we do some more grey mud?

Oh i like the feel of this can we do some more grey mud?

Much like everything on Serendipity Farm, the ramp and path were not easy to accomplish but again, like everything else that we have had to work hard to achieve here, it comes with a great sense of accomplishment and our efforts at having to think outside the box, heck, create new boxes to think outside of, are their own reward. I can’t use the path for a few days and by the time I can use it, I will be in the city staying with my daughters for a few days. Steve will be left in charge of the watering, the chook feeding, the chook fetching, one clucky chook needs to be brought inside at the end of the day from her chosen nest out on the property as the quoll is back on the scene and recently killed one of our young point of lay girls who was most unlucky to choose that day to go clucky on a single egg. He also has to walk the dogs, feed himself (but he has lasagne, fish pie and many MANY homemade pasties in the freezer so that’s not too difficult) and anything else that Steve deems important for a few days. By the time you read this I will actually be home from my daughter’s house and I am writing this blog post last Friday in preparation for my fleeing the coop for a few days.

Look mud i love the dirt says Earl

Look mud i love the dirt says Earl

 

This is why we need a path , we have sludge

This is why we need a path , we have sludge

 

Steve is outside whipper snipping parts of the garden that have gone completely feral. Some of the periwinkle and forget me nots have almost reached thigh height and taunt us daily as we walk down the driveway to take the dogs for their morning walks. Everything seems to be enjoying the lovely spring weather and taking the opportunity of the regular rain that we have been getting to grow like topsy. We planted out most of our Brachychiton discolor that we grew from seed that we sourced online back in 2009 when we first started to study horticulture and were studying in class. Being an Eastern rainforest species, we had no idea if they would grow this far down in Tasmania but we had a really good germination rate and most of them survived the last 5 years of neglect to be planted out down the driveway last year and all of them are thriving. If you would like to see what a Brachychiton discolor flower is like here is a link…

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brachychiton_discolor

Jan gave Fran a really lovely bread book

Jan gave Fran a really lovely bread book

We just restrung the hills hoist washing line that appeared to have the original string that it came with about 30 years ago dangling precariously by threads. We discovered plastic coated metal clothes line at Bunnings (Big hardware store) and restrung the top of Sanctuary with it to stop the possum invader hoards and we had some left over that we decided we would fix the poor sagging washing line. There is something incredibly satisfying in accomplishing something with your day. Today we strung up the clothes line, I cut the marauding honeysuckle vine out of a rosemary bush, Steve cut down 2 saplings inside the compound that had the ability to grow into major problems in about 10 years time and I chopped them up and we put them on the compost heap inside Sanctuary. Those gates/doors in the shed that lead into Sanctuary are amazing. Steve whipper snipped part of the garden that was threatening to collapse under the combined weight of the forget-me-nots and the periwinkle and we have been pottering around “doing things” all day. I am just about to see how amazingly explosive my old blender can be when filled with compost and subject to high revvage in order to turn said compost into light friable seed raising mix potentials. I am not too fussed if it blows up as I rarely use the food processor that it is attached to anyway but I need this seed raising mix!

The old raggy line

The old raggy line

 

New line on the washing line

New line on the washing line

I will get back to those packets of seeds that Jan gave to me. There are lots of herb seeds including chives, dill, parsley and peppermint along with caraway which will be most interesting if it germinates. Lots of flower seeds that I will grow in punnets and plant out among the veggies to confuse the pests and a good selection of veggie seedlings including San Marzano tomato seed! Keep your fingers crossed that they germinate even if the use by date might be slightly overdue. Nothing ventured, nothing gained. I love a good experiment and adventure and living the way that we do is a constant chance for a bit of adventurous experimentation. We have learned to solve all kinds of problems and encounters with pieces of string, flour and salt glue and a dab of spit and polish and we are thinking of calling ourselves “MacGyver 1 and MacGyver 2” If Dr Seuss had been around to write another Cat in the Hat opus, I am sure he could have done worse than doing a deal with MacGyver 1 and MacGyver 2.

Shuttering ready for concrete

Shuttering ready for concrete

 

The concrete helper is here ...

The concrete helper is here …

Getting there ..

Getting there ..

A great path now

A great path now

Looking good i think ( i didn't do a trowel finish as we want to be able to grip when its wet)

Looking good i think ( i didn’t do a trowel finish as we want to be able to grip when its wet)

Time to head off and get back into the garden. The dogs would have me believe that it is time for them to be fed but I am thinking there might be a bit of time to prune something, pot something up or at least stand on the deck and plot some kind of garden resurrection. Hopefully you are all up to your ears in something that delights you and makes you smile or like us, up to your armpits in mud and horse manure and smiling politely with your mouth shut because no-one wants horse manure in their teeth 😉

View from the cherry tree to the house

View from the cherry tree to the house

A view from the new compound that the boys love :) Also frans indicator tree

A view from the new compound that the boys love 🙂 Also frans indicator tree an apple that shows us we dont have possums in the new compound

 

A baby oak in its leaves

A baby oak in its leaves

 

And here we are with the cheese bird again :)

And here we are with the cheese bird again 🙂

 

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48 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. rabidlittlehippy
    Oct 15, 2014 @ 17:57:27

    And here was me thinking this post meant you actually were back! Then again I know you know how to post in advance. Oh I do hope it means you’re back. Missed ya!

    Nice one on the ramp too and the rouch surface. Clever thinking in my book. Best of luck on the seeds and viability too. I planted out some well overdue (from 2009) sugar snap peas but not one raised its little green head. Even the pea seeds from 2 years back have had lacklustre results but I have also been very late planting them and its time for the beans to go in anyway. Ah well.

    Gees that Kurrajong has one hell of a mean looking beak. Vicious! I wonder if your eggstraordinary egg movements have come from your Kurrajong behaving like the local crows we have here. The buggers kept pinching and eating our neighbours eggs. They won’t fly inside the small chook/duck sized entrance though and the larger access is locked to prevent caprine access so our eggs are only eaten by their owners. *sigh*

    I’ve been out planting today too. A friend sent me some cape gooseberry seeds 😉 which I popped into soil today. Jas’s broad bean experiments needed potting up, I sowed the blueberry seeds I rescued from inside frozen blueberries and I also sowed out 60 corn seeds (or are they still kernals?). I’ve been breaking off the branches of my windowsill basil plants too and when in water they’re rooting up nicely so I planted them and my single sweet potato slip out too. I’ve got 60 or so pumpkin seeds up, over 100 tomato seedlings and eggplants, watermelons, and more all coming up. Spring is most exciting! 🙂

    Hope the nail mends quickly and the mototor of the food processor lives to tell the tale.

    Reply

  2. Chica Andaluza
    Oct 15, 2014 @ 18:27:05

    There is indeed somethng very magical abut raising plants from seed. I remember my first attempts at this were in Spain as I was craving chillies and we just couldn’t buy them 10 years agp where I live. People gave me different chillies and I ended up with so many one year I could have set up a market stall! Braod beans are a regular crop for us too and these are always grown from the beans. When we did some work in our allotment way back, we only had a few chickies and to this day the cement bears their little prints 🙂 Don’t do too much and hope you have/had fun with your daughter!

    Reply

  3. Littlesundog
    Oct 16, 2014 @ 00:51:04

    I got a good chuckle over the cheese bird. I would be that bird you know… I love cheese! I was given a lot of old garden seeds a few years ago, and spent a couple of days sowing them in various spots just to see if they would germinate. Some of these were ten years old while others just a year or two old. None of the vegetables came up but a few varieties of flower seeds did germinate and flourish. It was a good experiment despite not having much luck. I’m not sure most of the seeds were kept in dry cool storage prior to being given to me. I think that makes a big difference.

    We had rain this weekend so my project today will be pulling up tomato cages and t-posts, soaker hoses and spent plants. The sun is shining and the wind is down. It should be a grand day to clean things up a tad, and prepare for the winter months that will arrive before we know it! I hope you are having a splendid visit with your family!

    Reply

  4. The Snail of Happiness
    Oct 16, 2014 @ 01:38:38

    Lovely, lovely path!
    I’m not convinced about formal learning, even though I spend quite a bit of my time teaching! I try to get my learners to explore ideas, have discussions and build their own meaning, but I think I am probably the exception… and I only teach adults. I always consider that I am educated despite school rather than because of it. I grew up in a house full of books and with parents who encouraged us to ask questions, go to the library and explore. These things were actively discouraged at school (apart from the library, but even then that was just a place to be quiet). What are we doing to our children, I wonder?

    Reply

    • thecontentedcrafter
      Oct 16, 2014 @ 14:09:27

      Oooh I so agree! And I was a teacher – albeit not a state school one! I say don’t do it unless it makes your heart sing! But then I say that about everything 🙂

      When you are ‘learning’ stuff simply to get the right boxes ticked I really question the voracity of that as education. Education is studying something to get to understand and know about it in depth, to widen your horizons and open your mind and your heart. To add new skills to your hands, your head and your heart! And finally I would say if you still really feel you have to do it – then do it accepting what the consequences are [the programme, the expectations, the outcomes etc] and do it with all your attention and as much grace as you can muster for the situation. Here endeth today’s lesson 🙂 Sorry Snail, I pitched in and got carried away again….

      Reply

      • narf77
        Oct 17, 2014 @ 04:59:24

        I am SO with you on this one Ms Pauline. We had a glorious Steiner school in my little teeny tiny home town of Denmark Western Australia, the hippy hub central of W.A. Way back in the early 60’s when the hippies were rising like a good froth to the top of a welcome beer in the heat of summer, our little wood mill dependent town (2 mills) was completely divided by the hippy invasion that hit and it remained that way till well into the 80’s when hippies became socially acceptable elder statesmen in our town. The Steiner school was just down the road from the state school and I remember our neighbours daughter going there and being SO jealous of her because the Steiner school was the epitome of awesomeness where it was rumoured that the kids actually learned at their own pace, the teachers took them out on all sorts of awesome educational outings and they weren’t forced to wear uniforms…milk and honey stuff indeed! Then we heard about home schooling from a girl that rocked up, home educated, when she was heading into high school (her mum didn’t feel confident that she could give her a high school education) and she aced the class instantly. We had students that were forced to stand with the bin on their head as punishment for what I now know was a serious case of ADHD and the cane was delivered on a regular basis. I have only started enjoying “education” now that I am older and choose my education rather than have it poured into my skull at the going rate. SO many kids fall through the gaps with poor harried teachers forced to meet quota’s of passing students having to bypass those that are struggling in order to bolster those that are going to hand them another year of work…class sizes increasing (at least in Tasmania, thanks to our latest government) and teacher numbers being cut (same government) because obviously that’s where we should be making budget savings…education is a farce these days and something that only the rich can expect to gain any sort of results from. Back in 2006 I did a course to teach me how to work in an office environment. One of my fellow students was a recently graduated, fully qualified lawyer who couldn’t get a job anywhere…she was “retraining” so that she would have a chance to find employment. Back when I was a kid you got out of school and you got a job…easy…now you can study for 7 years, amass a HUGE HECS debt and still not find employment. There are no sureties when it comes to education and progression any more so is it really worth all of those years being cram packed with “information” when at the end of it, you are left with a head full of information and not much more?

  5. Born To Organize
    Oct 16, 2014 @ 03:50:35

    So much to love here. Ducky in her pool and Earl in the cement made me grin. What a great idea adding doors into the side of the shed.

    I hope you’ve had a good visit with your daughters and a bit of a rest too. Welcome back.

    Reply

  6. foodnstuff
    Oct 16, 2014 @ 12:19:01

    I always used to think borecole was broccoli written by someone who couldn’t spell!

    Reply

  7. thecontentedcrafter
    Oct 16, 2014 @ 14:29:12

    I’m late – and look at what happens when I’m late. I start airing my thoughts all over the show and getting carried away with myself! Your frustration with the studying and TAFE and all that strikes quite a chord in me that is aimed solely at the inadequacies of the global education system for children and adults alike. I am also aware that bits of paper have become relatively meaningless in the world of employers – look at the amount of graduates who can’t get work – and I’m totally convinced that enthusiasm for learning about the thing that arouses your passion can be done by yourself or in company with a band of like-minded people – which is how the whole education system first began anyway.

    If you are clear about why you would undertake the course of study – do it for those reasons and learn to ride over and beyond the inevitable frustrations that will be part of it and get what you can from it.

    Hope you had a fab time with your daughter/s and have arrived safely home. Steve’s concreting looks pretty darn good to me and I think the addition of a doggie paw print is a must – obviously Earl thinks so too! Serendipity Farm is having a make-over in tremendous leaps and bounds at the moment – all this activity is quite mind boggling to me with my tiny ‘garden’ and my tiny stints in the art room.

    I’m pretty sure I remember that seeds were found in one of the pyramids. They were germinated and planted and grew – but I don’t remember what they were or when it happened. I need to take ginko biloba for my memory!

    Reply

    • narf77
      Oct 17, 2014 @ 05:07:26

      I should have read this comment before I spouted off on the last one ;). Social media has people being led by the nose and bleating like lambs but it also delivers us a wonderful platform to learn from each other, to find some very interesting information and to get pointed in the right direction to find whatever you want to know/learn. Like anything that can be manipulated, you have to be careful to hunt out the “good stuff” and bypass the morass of bampf/hype carefully without saturating yourself in “all things that glitter” that are most definitely NOT gold. I took this course because Stevie-boy wanted to do it. I wasn’t at all sure that I would be able to finish this course because it involved some serious software education in duplicate BUT I love the program now (Illustrator) and am very glad that I took the risk to learn something that I wasn’t entirely sure about. I think you take what you can out of education. If you are getting nothing out of it, it isn’t worth continuing in that direction as far as I am concerned. We are all primed to aim in certain directions, I guess the wonderful thing about adult education is that you have enough life experience (and “self” experience) to have a handle on what direction you should be firing and to be able to aim that way. Had a great time with my daughters and Earl proudly struts his stuff over that path…it is obviously his now. I am sure that inside that little hard bonce of his there are thoughts about toll bridges…
      I think tiny steps allow you to recover in between. We need to pace ourselves or it all becomes too much and we have to head under the bed and hide for a bit. I have lots of small ginkgo biloba’s that we grew from locally sourced seed. I plan on planting them all over Serendipity Farm and living on the leafy extract to keep my brain ticking over 😉

      Reply

      • thecontentedcrafter
        Oct 17, 2014 @ 05:44:17

        Or crosswords or committing poems to memory – all these things help 🙂 I once took ginko and it worked such a treat that I went a whole year without a diary and never missed a thing – my colleagues amused themselves by asking me what was happening at certain times on certain days and I always knew. Then I got cocky – and look at me now sigh! Why am I telling you this?

      • narf77
        Oct 17, 2014 @ 06:30:51

        Because you love me and I am a dear (and distant) confidant 😉 Seriously, I am with you all the way on memory. I think the insidious thing is that the more we rely on notes and diaries, the more our brain adapts to using them. The alternative is to always be late and to never be anywhere you need to be 😉

  8. thecontentedcrafter
    Oct 16, 2014 @ 14:33:13

    Completely forgot to say that any body who can make as much sense as Frank Zappa does in that comment isn’t whacked out at all! I also always think of Pete Seeger’s song ‘Little Boxes’ and George Orwells ‘1984’

    Reply

    • narf77
      Oct 17, 2014 @ 05:08:29

      I used to think that Frank Zapper was just a huge dope fueled crazy man till I met Steve and actually read up on him. Very clever man who strutted to the beat of his own ukulele 😉

      Reply

  9. Margaret Griffin
    Oct 16, 2014 @ 22:41:40

    Hi, I was interested to see you refer to your visiting cheese eater as a ‘Kurrajong’ and am wondering if this is Tasmanian for ‘Currawong’. In Victoria, we have the Pied Currawong and the Grey Currawong. The Black Currawong only hangs out in Tasmania. They are all audacious birds which love cheese. Your photographs brought back memories of a visit to Tasmania many years ago when I was at one of the national parks. I remember the cries of a party of nuns when they discovered a group of currawongs helping themselves to the nun’s afternoon tea.

    I take it Bezial is allergic to concrete as he was taking no part in making his mark in the new path.

    What course are you planning to study next year at TAFE? I can understand the attraction of distance learning but attending classes may not be as onerous as you fear.

    Reply

    • narf77
      Oct 17, 2014 @ 05:18:34

      I always mix up my Currawong’s and my Kurrajongs. One is a bird and one is a plant! I doubt that we have trees pinching our eggs and cheese, cheers for the kind shove back onto the pathway of “right”eousness ;). Our birds have started to take advantage of the cheese stash and hog it. We have Mr Curry and his missus’ Mrs “Wong” (previously Mrs “Jong” but I stand corrected 😉 ) who fly in and out on the hunt for food. Earl has taken to protecting “his” cheese stash from the fat freeloading interlopers so it is quite amusing to watch him dancing up the deck after Curry and Mrs Wong swoops in to eat cheese while he is prancing at the end of the deck. Clever birds indeed! Bezial is a good boy and wouldn’t dare to walk on “Pa’s” path. Earl is a reprobate graffiti artist and his paw will live on in posterity (Bezial’s paw print is on the final bit of concreting that Steve did when he decided to check out the garden before it had set 😉 ). Attending classes holds no fear for me for “attendance” sake, but it means that we have to leave our 2 dogs, who haven’t been left at home alone before, alone for 2 days a week…that injects an element of fear. We are about to have interviews to see if we get accepted into Certificate 4 in Media. We studied Certificate 3 in Media prior to this current course that we are studying. At the time we couldn’t see a way for us to head into the city 2 days a week and separate the dogs if we had problems but now we have much more room and they could (if needs be) be separated for the duration so we think that we may be able to attend physical classes. We both studied horticulture for 4 years (2 online but we had to have physical catch-ups with our lecturer every 2 – 3 weeks) in a class and are quite confident that we can do it again. Studying from home really does spoil you.

      Reply

  10. Margaret Griffin
    Oct 17, 2014 @ 12:44:47

    Good Luck with your interviews next week. It is interesting to reflect on what shapes the decisions we make such as two naughty dogs. I am glad you can proceed knowing you will be able to come home to an undamaged house and two dogs who are still in one piece.

    Reply

  11. Robbie
    Oct 18, 2014 @ 02:55:47

    “We have learned to solve all kinds of problems and encounters with pieces of string, flour and salt glue and a dab of spit and polish and we are thinking of calling ourselves “MacGyver 1 and MacGyver 2” If Dr Seuss had been around to write another Cat in the Hat opus, I am sure he could have done worse than doing a deal with MacGyver 1 and MacGyver 2.”
    Priceless! LOVE IT!!!

    I ‘ve been out of town, too. Wow, you are getting a lot done and it looks like you are filling your life with a lot of worthwhile work! It is an experiment and I LOVE the aches after a day filled solving a problems:-)

    I feel Howard Gardner has the approach we need to take in all educational systems. He is my hero! If you get a chance check out his ideas on “intelligences”
    Here is his site
    http://howardgardner.com/

    Here are his intelligences:

    http://www.cse.emory.edu/sciencenet/mismeasure/genius/research02.html

    He makes sense + I have always believed he understands how we learn best. I am married to a school psychologist , so we go round and round about intelligence ( testing)being measured. When I was in graduate school, I took a class on “creativity” and it was the best class:-) I ever took..I have always been a free spirit and creative spirit, so I do not believe, we ALL learn the same. Our passions usually are an indication of our strengths, but we all need to be well-rounded. We have to practice on things we are not good at , but eventually we all fall into a career that integrates our natural intelligences….if we are smart! If we end up with one that does not, we are unhappy campers:-(. I always tried to nurture and ‘softly” direct my kids toward their passions + they found them….I also told them: “find work that is your passion,” for if you find IT, it will never be work!

    Happy Seed growing-look forward to seeing all your stuff-Okra sounds interesting..I have not been successful with that in our climate, it needs more hot days:-) I did get one okra-lol:-)
    Happy gardening-robbie:-)

    Reply

    • narf77
      Oct 18, 2014 @ 04:14:00

      A most excellent comment Robbie and I have bookmarked that site (and those intelligences) to check out ASAP. Education is an amazing privilage. To learn something new and to discover something new about yourself in the process is to be truly alive. I plan on learning for the rest of my life and for penniless student hippies, the internet is an amazing place to find out just about everything you want to know. You might just have to dig a bit deeper (sometimes a LOT deeper) but there are free classes all over the place and amazingly generous and skilled people out there willing to share their knowledge with us all. You just have to find them. As much as the modern education system is a minefield for students and there are an amazing number of cracks for students to fall into and never manage to climb out of, it is much MUCH worse for teachers and peripheral staff like your husband. People who really want to make a difference, to be a shining light in young minds and to open up those young minds to the possibilities and exciting premises of learning have to battle their way through the education system, satisfying all manner of bureaucratic and budgetary garbage before they can get to the education part. Education is more about fees and numbers (bums on seats as my gran would have said…) than it is about sharing knowledge and showing young minds the pathways to understanding. It’s big business and there are a lot of vested interests invoved whenever something can turn a profit, making sure that their profits are maintained at all costs which means cutting back in all areas to rationalise which only delivers more cracks to fall through and frustrates everyone involved who actually gives a damn. I had a lecturer not too long ago who couldn’t have cared less if any of us passed. He delivered the same lectures over and over and over again year after year. It was a “job” to him and it was obvious. He was a 9 – 5 man and any time after that was his own. When that starts to happen to an educator, I think it is time to get out of the game to be honest. I am hoping that because it is so dry here for such a long time, that I might be able to fool the okra into thinking it is back in California (or wherever it actually comes from 😉 ). Seed sowing is very exciting isn’t it? 🙂 Steve and I have been helping some good friends pack up their stuff so that they can move out of the state and store it before heading over to Germany so it has been a bit manic around here for the last week or so. Hopefully it settles down again by next week and I can get stuck back into gardening again 🙂

      Reply

      • Robbie
        Oct 18, 2014 @ 05:10:36

        I have had my share of teachers that thought we should roll out the red carpet for them at the entrance of the doorway to our classroom! This happens too often at the college level! They are so impressed with themselves. They forget they are given a precious gift, to shape the minds of the future:-) They just get lost along the way or never were very good from the start:-(
        None of my children went into education but my friends did, and they are inspiring!..It is refreashing to see their kids with all their wide-eyed idealism….hope they keep that closer to their heart…It is sad when others get lost along the way:-( But I must say the ones I’ve see lately are just great!!!!
        I no longer am in any system but my new system of growing PLANTS…and like you, I will be a life long learner..how could anyone be anything else:-)
        It is VERY exciting and I am growing more veggies for more people in my community + I love to see their faces when they tell me about my plants + how they grew for them…the excitement in their voice is what keeps me growing and fussing in the dirt!!
        It is the best place to be….it is where I want to spend the next 50 years of my life!!!!

      • narf77
        Oct 18, 2014 @ 05:21:41

        I had some particularly amazing teachers in my past but at the time I didn’t realise it. Some of them gave me opportunities that gently urged me in directions that I didn’t realise would give me life skills that would help me to cope with so much more than education. It’s only later in life that I have appreciated education and learning in particular. Isn’t it amazing to see the joy in people’s faces when they discover the dirt? My horticulture lecturer would get a stick to me if he heard me say “dirt” but it IS dirt! Dirt filled with possibilities :). Whatever the language, nature can bring us all together and whether or not we understand each other, hand signals and nature go a long way to linking us all and giving us a common language that spans everything. I just love meeting people who “get” that :). With you on the next 50 and although I am late to gardening, I have BIG plans 😉

      • Robbie
        Oct 18, 2014 @ 05:33:42

        “dirt’ aww…a soilsnob-lol

      • narf77
        Oct 18, 2014 @ 05:39:48

        It’s all dirt till nature throws in the good stuff as far as I am concerned. Much like we have to earn our stripes, so does dirt!

      • Robbie
        Oct 18, 2014 @ 05:57:45

        and all the little workers do their stuff:-)
        some dirt is dirt-lol

      • narf77
        Oct 18, 2014 @ 06:01:04

        Amen to that! 😉

      • Robbie
        Oct 18, 2014 @ 06:01:42

        wait…hold on…remembered this..dirt is dead…soil is alive with life…so there is a big difference…you are so right!

      • narf77
        Oct 18, 2014 @ 17:13:11

        Yup, so first it is dirt, then it is soil 😉 It can just as easily go back to dirt though so you have to keep feeding it to keep it soil…very convoluted 😉

      • Robbie
        Oct 18, 2014 @ 06:02:19

        okay..I am heading outside to toil in my soil!

      • narf77
        Oct 18, 2014 @ 17:13:34

        I toiled in my soil as well and planted out brassicas which made me happy 🙂

  12. Robbie
    Oct 18, 2014 @ 05:13:02

    ” my friends kids” did-lol..I never proof read! till too later but I figure you know what I am t alking about!

    Reply

    • narf77
      Oct 18, 2014 @ 05:22:31

      Yup…those muses do a great job in translating (mostly what my addled brain spills out at any given time but I “get” other addled minds implicitly 😉 )

      Reply

      • Robbie
        Oct 18, 2014 @ 05:30:11

        usually many steps ahead I bet so they get ALL “infers” + “jests”-lol Well, at least in my situation!

      • narf77
        Oct 18, 2014 @ 05:38:47

        My fingers can’t go as fast as my brain so I tend to combine half words with other words and my spelling is terrible. If I didn’t have spell checker I dare say I would be monosyllabic 😉

      • narf77
        Oct 18, 2014 @ 05:39:01

        (I had to check how to spell that 😉 )

  13. Hannah (BitterSweet)
    Oct 19, 2014 @ 12:17:51

    You are going to be in herb and vegetable heaven in no time! I’m trying not to be jealous thinking about the bounty that you’ll soon reap… But even more importantly, I’m trying to send positive vibes out for those little cherimoya seeds. I really hope they cooperate and sprout nicely for you. I’m nervous because I never got them to show any signs of life over on this side of the pond, but I’m holding on to belief that it was just too cold, or my thumb was simply too black for them to survive. I just know you’ll have the magic touch!

    Reply

  14. christiglover
    Oct 20, 2014 @ 09:25:30

    Aloha, Fran, and that is quite some bird beak on that black cheese bird…I looked up Kurrajong, and it’s a tree. What kind of bird is that, anyway? Ah, I see another reader had the same query. So it’s a Currawong! Lol

    We just had an owl in an ohia tree and I’ve put the word out to try and identify it. Not a barn owl. Maybe an endangered Pueo, or Hawaiian owl. I got a good picture for FB.

    I love your seed work. As Robert Louis Stevenson said: Don’t judge each day by the harvest you reap but by the seeds you plant. That’s you and Steve!

    Nice new wash line and things and looking spring-fresh down there in the Southern Hemp. And I have to ask, where does the title come from?

    Reply

  15. Yelena
    Oct 20, 2014 @ 12:51:50

    I am absolutely agree about education in America, I have two kids and it breaks my heart to see what they doing at school.

    Lovely bird you have here dear – have fun!!!

    Hugs,

    Yelena

    Reply

    • narf77
      Oct 21, 2014 @ 05:20:56

      I am just incredibly glad that all of my kids are now adults Yelena and I don’t have to worry about the education system. I think if you teach your kids good values and they know the value of learning, they will be OK in any education system. It’s the kids whose parents don’t value education whose kids slip through the cracks.

      Reply

  16. athursdayschild has a long way to go and much to be thankful for.
    Oct 21, 2014 @ 03:40:37

    I quite agree with Frank Zappa.

    Reply

  17. Sue Dreamwalker
    Oct 28, 2014 @ 05:49:30

    Wow.. Lots going on… purple artichoke’s now they sound good… And all of those seeds left.. I have found seeds last often well past their sell by date.. We have had some dried Kidney beans that are about 4 yrs old now and they grew a grand crop of beans this year.. 🙂
    Loved all your photo’s The washing will now be blowing neatly in the wind! 🙂 too..

    Enjoy your day xx

    Reply

    • narf77
      Oct 28, 2014 @ 08:02:21

      The washing would have blown away in the wind last night if I had been foolish enough to leave it on the line. We had a lovely storm that is now a blowy sunny day… the very best kind 🙂

      Reply

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