What a Mingy Comumbus a.k.a. “Oh COCK!”

Hi All,

To find out what the title of today’s post means you either have to find Series 2, episode 4 of James May’s “Man Lab” or you need to get your fingers googling. No laziness here folks…this blog is all about educating the masses and how are you EVER going to get ejamicated without a bit of work from your side eh? Steve actually prefers his version (well…the version that he was hunting for this morning online and curiously finding nothing at ALL to do with it…) the “Mumbly Comumbus”. Steve loved this SO much he has renamed “The Tubby Piggins” to “The Mumbly Comumbus”…A fitting name for his little aluminium coracle…go look it up! I KNOW it is driving you crazy! ;). I had a Mingy Comumbus of a day on Monday. I went to town with Steve and the dogs to do the fortnightly shopping on a hot day when the dogs and I spent most of the time in the car because I can’t hold both excited boys myself and we were forced to endure extended periods in a hot car. I KNOW that dogs die in hot cars but so do middle aged women! We had the windows down and doors open (well my door was open, Earls door was decidedly NOT! 😉 ) but that doesn’t make up for having to sit in the sun while Steve dashed in and out of various shops hindered by an exponentially grouchy wife and 2 panting pups. I completely forgot half of what I wanted to buy in town because I was feeling so twitchy, I have lost my city legs and was swaying from side to side mentally the whole time I was in the city. We got home and Steve had to race out to go and pick up some more craft wood from a man who is moving away from the area but Steve teed up to buy some more delicious varieties of wood from so he had to be there for 2pm. I hurriedly opened the kitchen window to give the insistent cuckoo shrike some cheese cubes and in the process hit our knife sharpener that caused a chain reaction that knocked a little blue and white flowerpot that had been on mums windowsill in her tiny little unit over. The pot didn’t break but every single one of my lovely blue and white ceramic jam spoons that it contained flew out all over the place and shattered into smithereens…”OH COCK!” as James May would say…the day was just “one of those” days…we all have to bear them…it wasn’t particularly fundamentally “bad” but it wasn’t one that I would have chosen and we all need days like this to show us how good our normal days really are. Update: not all of my ceramic spoons are broken! I found one in the cutlery draw…Steve must have put it there and for once, I am glad of his absentmindedness about where he puts things after he washes up :o)

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Earl bagsed top bunk…

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“Is this how you drive? Why isn’t it going?”

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“I prefer to be chauffered…”

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“Any fish in here?”

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Tilly, Nat’s dog enjoying one of the dogs treats

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“So you won’t get up for me to sit down eh?”…

I don’t watch a lot of television but I do LISTEN to a lot. I spend a lot of time in the kitchen/living room because that is where my base station is. Our desktop P.C. is the centre of my day and I have invisible threads that allow me to head out and do everything that I do in my day but I inevitably end up back checking something, researching something that I thought of while I was bum’s up in the garden or making sure that I didn’t forget to do something. I was doing the dishes the other day when I heard that Tasmania is going to have the driest January on record. We have a very lean 3 months in Northern Tasmania over the summer period as it is and rather than see this as an imminent threat, I prefer to see it as a challenge. Enter my arid food growing guru Bev from the wonderfully informative blog http://foodnstuff.wordpress.com/ she is my kind of problem solver. She uses a variety of permaculture principals on her property and reading about her exploits is both interesting and informative. I especially love her water wicked containers. In her latest post she shows how she has grown salad veggies in one of her wicked boxes and in arid conditions where water is likely to be limited these wicked boxes give you a whole lot of control over your food supply. I found a tutorial on how to make self watering raised veggie boxes here… http://www.josho.com/gardening.htm But I have to say that Bev had an equally excellent tutorial on her website that you can check out here… http://foodnstuff.wordpress.com/2012/12/27/preparing-a-wicking-box/  . Bev is also an incredibly generous gardener with sharing her hints, tips and spare seed. I am eagerly awaiting some parsnip seed that she managed to grow in copious quantities…no parsnips but plenty of seed and when life hands you parsnipless seeds, you pass them on! Lesson learned…no snips BUT a plethora of new interstate friends who love to collect seed and share as well. I am still ruminating the Aussie seed swap. I think it’s a fantastic idea and just because I have had to go back to horticultural kindergarten with my sideline into vegetable gardening

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One of Steve’s finds whilst pootling around on the river the other day…isn’t this place lovely?

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Part of the lovely house in the last photo and we think that they might be walnut trees

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Walking down the driveway to check the mail…

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And walking back up again…it’s no wonder Steve has skinny legs 😉

I have just realised why I am willing to be kicked out of bed at 3.50am by the dog and head out into the dark early morning to read blogs through my rss feed reader…it enlivens and invigorates my mind. I LOVE learning…I love the cut and thrust of replying to comments and sharing my opinion and I love that I can do it from the comparative safety of my own little kitchen miles away from the coalface of the original idea. I can wander through a list of amazing personally selected blogs that feed my mind and act as jumper leads to my day. I flick from amazing food blogs…lots of innovative vegan blogs and gorgeous foodie blogs with amazing recipes to cutting edge fermentation sites and sites where I learn how to make just about everything. Then I have my environmental sites. I hate depressing doom and gloom sites and refuse to frequent them. I love positivity in the face of insurmountable odds and that’s the sort of blogs I frequent…”the world is going to hell in a hand basket but we will be bullocked if we are going down without a fight…” that sort of site. I had best clear up now that I don’t frequent crazy stockpiling hillbilly “shoot the neighbour Brandeen…they are stealin’ our food stores!” sites that sort of site can make you crazier than you already are! I might occasionally veer side left to pinch a plan for a rocket stove or wood fired oven plan but I cover my eyes because I KNOW they are probably taking on other forms! ;). I have blogs in my rss feed readers that defy classification…one such blog I actually hoard. It’s called “23 Thorns” and if this man puts out a book I am buying it. I don’t care if I have to work down t’ coal mines for a month to do so, his writing is that entertaining. Check it out if you want to end up on the floor laughing…this man is the bomb! This link takes you to his series of “The Lowveld Posts” an absolutely hilarious look at the wildlife that inhabits his local area. You should go there merely to read about these amazing creatures in Africa and woven through his amazing posts that are incredibly well written (the man is a wordsmith) is a background of Africa warts and all…

http://23thorns.wordpress.com/category/the-lowveld-posts/

One day when I have more time available to me when I won’t feel guilty for taking perhaps an entire tea fuelled week, I am going to wade through every single one of this bloggers posts. He is the Patch Adams of blogs and I, for one, prefer 23 Thorns to chocolate! There…I said it :o). I urge you all to at least have a look at these wonderful posts that will hopefully bring a smile to your day :o)

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Steve got a shock when this seal shot out of the water right next to his boat the other day

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A visitor to Serendipity Farm hunting for insects (or maybe a drink of water?) on his way through

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Our friend in the witness protections front garden (well a bit of it) to show you how dry it is in our region at the moment

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Our friend in the witness protections all enclosed veggie garden doing as well as ours is. That compost is pure gold!

Today we are heading back into town. We need to get some fruit (for my daily green smoothie habit) and chia seed that I completely and utterly forgot on my “diem horribilis” on Monday. We are also going to visit our friend in the witness protection ostensibly to “visit” but really, for me to have a good perve at her fully enclosed garden and see how her partner Glen made it. Her veggies are also going great guns and she has runaway snow peas going crazy all over the enclosure. We can only assume that because of our widely varying soil conditions, our joint success has come from the rich organic compost that we purchased by the trailer load from Exeter Landscaping. I don’t think that they are going to benefit from my free plug there because their office receptionist, although eminently pleasant and approachable, is completely unable to navigate her way around their new website and completely bypasses it should anyone make a web enquiry…sigh…(and they wonder why Tasmania is lagging behind the rest of the world?). We have some young junipers and other hardy conifers that we don’t intend on planting out on Serendipity Farm that we are going to give her to plant out on her 40 acre property. She needs drought tolerant species that don’t mind getting their feet wet in the winter. Her property goes from arid desert in summer to swamp in winter and is festooned with possums and wallabies and rabbits at night time, all wanting to completely consume everything that she plants as soon as the sun goes down. Despite these drawbacks she is surprisingly willing to keep trying and her horticultural persistence is starting to pay off. I will take some photos of her garden unless it is starting to look like Serendipity Farm, dry, arid and like a 70’s Instagram version of its modern self all turned up corners and orange hued where I will allow her a degree of anonymity. We are also going to walk the dogs in the city again and also on Jenny’s property. They are going to have a ball! I have to say “Hi” and “Welcome back” to Nat, one of my best mates and a dear constant reader of this humble blog. She is back at Polytechnic working as a horticultural lecturer for another year which allows her to occasionally take a brief foray into the world of Serendipity Farm and keep her on the cutting edge of insanity on a regular basis. I do my bit girl… I do my bit! 😉

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Our friend in the witness protection gave me this enormous sack of silverbeet, carrots and snow peas…Earl had a bit of a sniff but found them all wanting

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My fruit haul including 7kg of bananas @ .90c a kilo, 5 enormous mangoes @ $1.00 each and some nectarines and apricots @ $4.99kg. I have enough fruit for green smoothies to last me a month!

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The bananas have already been frozen and just the mangoes and sundry fruit to go 🙂

It’s now 5.23. Bezial threw me out of bed at 3.50am and the young rooster that lives under the deck is tentatively crowing the new day in. Another series of processes is just about to begin and as they weave their way into our psyche let’s just hope that today isn’t a repeat of Monday and to make sure, I am going to hide that one remaining ceramic jam spoon! See you all on Saturday and remember to tell us if you would like to win the spoon that Earl will draw on Saturday morning. EVERYONE can enter. We don’t care if you live on the moon…we love sharing with you all and please don’t think that you can’t enter the draw because you live in Timbuktu…so do we! We know what it is like to live in the sticks and feel out of the loop and we love to share with fellow out of the loopers all over the world. Secretly, Steve wants his spoons to be represented in every single continent so I am going to have to work hard to market this blog to several underrepresented countries (Africa…”who wants a spoon!”…same goes for India, Russia, China, Korea, Japan…sigh…)… you have to be in it to win it folks 😉

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40 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. rabidlittlehippy
    Jan 23, 2013 @ 22:20:52

    I totally and utterly LOVE LOVE LOVE 23 Thorns! His blog IS like chocolate and on a mingy comumbus day his writing is a balm unto the soul.
    Your compost sounds like pure gold which is also making me jealous. Sadly the composts I have bought of late all seem to be somewhat hydrophobic so I have much work to do before next spring. I am planning out and building my raised garden beds though over the next few days so next year I hope to match you verdant garden for verdant garden. 🙂
    And just in case I can sneak in a double entry 😉 I am ultra keen for than spoon. Remember Earl, MY walnut earns you steak! 😉 Good doggy. 😀

    Reply

    • narf77
      Jan 24, 2013 @ 05:05:39

      Earl is starting to get a little suspicious of offers for “big BIG bones (The naturophile)…enormous free range steaks (Thinking Cowgirl) and pats on the head etc. He is starting to realise that when you are famous, everyone wants a piece of you. A lesson a dog has to learn somewhat early in life methinks…I hope he doesn’t end up too jaded ;).

      Reply

  2. Debi at Life Currents
    Jan 24, 2013 @ 08:00:32

    Ok, I opened another tab on my computer for 23 Thorns. But I haven’t even gotten around to reading Veged Out yet! Oh, I’m so behind. It’s good that I only subscribe to 3 blogs!
    Hee hee, I’m such a lazy composter. Last time I put out compost I ended up with 3 vigorous tomato plants, 1 honeydew melon, 3 large tomatillo plants, and 2 butternut squash plants! Thus, the latest harvest & accompanying fish tacos and Guatemalan stew.
    I love what you said about all those blogs. One of the things I think is so amazing is that people from other sides of the globe can connect. Awesome.
    Have a lovely day!!! 🙂

    Reply

  3. The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap
    Jan 24, 2013 @ 09:34:29

    Love the doggie photos. There faces are so wonderful. 🙂 And that house across the lake is and the walks through what looks like forest areas are gorgeous.

    I am getting the comments from the other post but this didn’t arrive in my e-mail box today. Don’t know what I have to do to get yours. I clicked on your site link when the comment came in and saw this so that’s how I came to this one. I wish I had a little more tech expertise but alas a dummy I am.

    Big hug.
    Paulette

    Reply

    • narf77
      Jan 25, 2013 @ 05:17:55

      A big hug right back to you Paulette but I have NO idea why you aren’t getting the post sent to your email. Did you check your spam folder? It might have gone there? I sometimes have things that I subscribed to sent to my spam folder…not a bad idea to check? I am a tech dummie too. The only reason that I am as proficient as I am with it is because I met Steve online and we had a long distance relationship for 3 years before we were able to meet and marry and so I HAD to learn how to use these darned things! We have also been students for a while now and are able to study from home (we live 50km away from where we study) which is amazing BUT requires us to know what we are doing with a P.C. I am VERY lucky that Steve is a natural with a P.C. and is able to work out most things. We had to use a computer program designed for engineers called “AutoCAD” to plan and produce our Landscape Designs which almost did my head in! Steve worked it out and coached me though so I managed to learn how to use it and am quite proud of myself for our accomplishment but am under NO false aprehensions that it wasn’t Steve that dragged us both through that part of the course! ;). I find it very interesting that all of my adult children are as intelligent and proficient with computers as they are with a steadfast technophobic ludite for a mum! 😉

      Reply

  4. christiok
    Jan 24, 2013 @ 11:00:10

    Oh, Fran, sorry for your pissy day, and I agree, hot days in the city are just made to bring out the “twitchiness”…and have us knocking over precious pots of spoons. Your dog pictures warm my heart, especially the one of them sacked out. I can just imagine you at your base station with your big screen, typing like the wind, blowing fabulous find-kisses to all of your fans around the globe. I am now subscribed to that hilarious 23Thorns as well as Bev’s unpretentious Foodnstuff. They’re both gems. As is yours. Your photos are building Serendipity Farm in my mind over time…I recognize parts now! Hugs to the dogs and Steve, not necessarily in that order.:)

    Reply

    • narf77
      Jan 25, 2013 @ 05:38:38

      I was born to share Christi and I certainly couldn’t keep Bev and that wonderful anonymous African man who bleeds 23 thorns out onto the page with such verve and humour from any of my dear constant readers. The more people that read his blog the better the world is going to be :). Bev is very straight forward and calls a spade a spade. I love learning from her because “it is what it is!” with Bev and there is no bollocks about her. She has some amazing back posts if you want to check through on just about everything permaculture and although a lot of it is to do with ensuring food production in hot dry conditions, things like the hugelkulture gardens might interest you guys as a way to use up some of your twiggy heritage and BioChar is an excitement beyond belief…I learned all about “water wicking”, “hugelkulture” and lots of other things from reading her blog LONG before I ever commented on it. I love that I found you through hunting online. I love that the very first tentative link between us was your glorious home made polytunnel that made me want to keep going back to read your lovely blog and gave us a connection that will never be broken now my twin from Olalla 🙂 Give big ole B.O. a hug for me and tell him that that hot tub should be dealing with his problem by now! (B.O. my dear…what a delightful nickname! ROTFL! ;)). I am SO glad that you got the spoons! Steve was getting twitchy and almost headed out to the shed and made more to send to you. I love the white one best as well but Steve always loved the original one that you guys won. The white one is light and hard and you could jack up your car with it, it is THAT strong. The wood came from a tree that needed to be removed and was the very first time that we thought that we were going to make “something” from all of the trees that were removed or fallen on Serendipity Farm. There is a rowan tree that is on it’s last legs that will turn into beautiful magical spoons (Rowan trees are a portal…) and a gorgeous rare specimen of Sydney Redgum eucalypt (rare here in Tasmania) that lost a large limb in a recent wind event and that Steve is about to head off down into the jungle with his pith hat and chainsaw to retrieve. “Never let a chance go by!”…our creed on Serendipity Farm. If you latch on while you are presented with something by the universe, you will never have regrets :). It’s the story of our relationship and the story of our lives :).

      Reply

  5. brymnsons
    Jan 24, 2013 @ 19:35:36

    What a shame about those spoons Fran, I hate those days. I think that on those days one should retire to their bed, with a book in one hand, a laptop in the other 🙂 and not get out of bed until the next day! You also need to have a mug of tea, and something indulgent to eat. And your favourite mag. Anything that will make the day improve lol.

    Reply

    • narf77
      Jan 25, 2013 @ 05:44:06

      What a fantastic idea Kymmy! Now I just need to explain to Earl and Bezial why “mummy is in bed…it isn’t NICE to jump all over mummy while she is reading…No Early…slobbering all over mummy isn’t a nice thing while she has a good Patricia Cornwall book she hasn’t read yet”…”NO EARLY STOP EATING THAT BONE ON THE BED”! sigh…now that I think of it, I have suddenly lost all desire to read in bed! ;). I have a problem when I read…I confess…I fall instantly asleep just like my mum did (and I secretly scorned her at the time for her lack of staying power…) and wake up chin on chest with Earl eyeing off my book. NOT a good state of affairs. I actually woke up once to find my book on my lap and Earl gently trying to extract it from my fingers! DANGER…DANGER…DANGER…! Lights flashing etc.! I am starting to learn about “bad days” and am teaching myself to allow myself to accept them and go with the flow. They are going to happen anyway and everything happens for a reason…even bad days. Maybe only to show you how lovely a simple “good day” can be and that you don’t have to win lotto or a ferarri to feel like a lucky girl? Who knows :). I might have to lay in the bed in the middle room (where you will stay when you come) with the door closed to escape the enormous bookworm and “read” (sleep…) with a cup of tea (soon to be cold 😉 )

      Reply

  6. The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap
    Jan 25, 2013 @ 03:41:20

    I didn’t know what to say about the spoons yesterday so came back to say I hope today’s a better day.

    Reply

    • narf77
      Jan 25, 2013 @ 05:51:11

      I am in the process of learning that you have to have a bad day to make your good days (and even your normal ones) that much more wonderful and to appreciate what you have because everything is “swings and roundabouts”. Everything strives for balance and you can’t have a good day without a bad one just around the corner. Humans are the only creatures that expect everything to run smoothly and to be over the moon every single moment of the day. It simply isn’t possible and we all need to learn to work through those Mingy cumumbus days and learn what we can from them. There is ALWAYS a lesson in there somewhere …It’s just our job to learn from them :). Good luck with the spoon Paulette, Steve made a tiny little wooden sassafras heart to go with the spoon. It is gorgeous and as usual I want it lol! He has made me so many gorgeous spoons that I refuse to use because they are too lovely to stick into a pot of chilli, or soup or to stir a casserole…too much form, and not enough function ;). Yesterday I went to the most magnificent garden I have ever been in. A couple moved out to the country in the mountains and created 2 1/2 acres of gorgeousness. I took so many pictures I almost filled my camera and everything delighted me. They have the same ethos with gardens that I have… lots of foliage, texture and secret nooks rather than a plethora of flowers. I don’t like blousy gardens full of flowers…I often wonder what is hiding underneath them! 😉 I love real gardens with grasses and trees and perennials and things that do their own thang’ and seed themselves year after year so your garden evolves and tumbles itself into another year and everything changes for the better :). Gardening is the closest thing that we have to being able to conduct a small symphony in our world and no matter how small a space we have, there is always a garden in the making, you just need to “see” it 🙂

      Reply

      • rabidlittlehippy
        Jan 25, 2013 @ 08:58:00

        What an AMAZING way to describe it! “Gardening is the closest thing that we have to being able to conduct a small symphony in our world…”It is just that! My first symphony has been along the lines of twinkle twinkle but I did attempt it as a 3 part harmony. 😉 I look forward to future years and tuning in the full concert orchestra to play Vivaldi’s Four Seasons.

      • narf77
        Jan 25, 2013 @ 13:51:03

        My dad was buried in the small graveyard right next to the boundary fence between Serendipity Farm and the Auld Kirk church next door…he was an atheist and had a serious problem with the church bells at 10am on a Sunday morning and would turn up his record player (ludites run in our family! 😉 ) to 13 and would crank out Wagner’s “Ride of the Valkyrys” as loud as it would go…as they were lowering his coffin into the ground I got Steve to run back home (without anyone else seeing) and crank up the record player to blast it out one last time for the old hippocritical sod! (buried in a church graveyard dad? 😉 )…music is the expression of true beauty. Whether or not that beauty flows out as a result of some gorgeousness that excites the passions or is wrenched out in loss…it is all the same…a true expression of the human spirit and one day this garden is going to resonate with sound… most probably Soundgarden and the neighbours will complain BUT that is beside the point…it will be harmonious and it WILL be entirely ours 🙂

  7. The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap
    Jan 25, 2013 @ 09:35:41

    I love what you wrote about gardening being the closest thing to conducting a symphony. That’s really lovely. And, as for the good days and bad days, well said – lot of wisdom here. My problem was not so much that but what to say to another, especially in cyberspace, sometimes it comes and other times not. I felt bad the spoons shattered. It was a shame but I’m with you on it moving into the next moment and that it is the bad days that lend to appreciation of the good ones. Thank you. 🙂

    Reply

    • narf77
      Jan 25, 2013 @ 13:55:17

      I think that the “bad” that I felt when my spoons shattered was incredibly momentary and was entirely replaced with rage within nanoseconds Paulette! I am not good with bad days…I rise up like the froth on the top of boiling milk and it requires the quick turning off of the ignition source before I drop, just as quickly back down into my holding pan ;). I am an opptimist and tend to keep looking for that silver lining in everything. I figure it gives me something to look forwards to 🙂

      Reply

      • The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap
        Jan 25, 2013 @ 14:43:48

        I’m with you on attitude being everyting and given a choice I chose positive but we’re human and stuff happens aong with emotions. No switch to turn ’em on or off but what we make of them, like you write, that’s it. Now to zzzzzzzzzz. 🙂

  8. The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap
    Jan 25, 2013 @ 09:43:25

    Three year long distance relationship before you met? Wow, and now look at your incredible relationship and the lovely world you’ve create around you. It’s a lovely story. Did you keep that 3 year correspondence? I’m a romantic.

    I hear you about not wanting to use your nice spoons. They’re art pieces and objects of love from your Steve.

    Your trip yesterday sounds beautiful. Was that the place you photographed across the lake? That was beautiful.

    I think I may have solved the tech mystery but we’ll see. You wrote something somewhere that I read about seeing something in your “reader” so I played around with this and that and found the manage site. Viola, I rest your site to daily receiving. All my sites were set to not receiving anything. The only ones I saw were the ones that posted a “Like” or comment to my site and I’d check out their links and posts that way. This should make it easier and I hope it works. Tech things make me anxious and I have this stupid idea I’ll click on something and something will break. Got to get over that one.

    Reading your writing feels like sitting next to you and listening. So alive and real. 🙂

    Reply

    • narf77
      Jan 25, 2013 @ 14:01:50

      At the moment you wouldn’t want to sit next to me Paulette because we had a teeny little rainshower and my best mates the leeches decided to come out in force and I am bleeding profusely from the ankle…I don’t know what it is about me but they adore me and seek me out…perhaps I should be flattered? ;). I hope you have sorted out the problem as well and Steve and I didn’t keep the communications because they ammounted to a massive amount of word documents that we put onto floppy discs and submitted to the relevant governmental department as proof of our relationship status and they simply told us that they could be full of viruses and that they didn’t want to look at them! AARRGGHHH! So long as we handed over $2000 they were fine with Steve staying 2 years till he got permanency…..forgive me for being a little jaded by the whole thing ;). The trip wasn’t to that lovely “secret” house…you can’t even see that house from the road (we know…we tried 😉 ) so it is situated right on the Tamar River but you can only see it by boat! Gorgeous and mystical…we went to a lovely garden called “Wychwood” that the owners are attempting to sell and that everyone living in this state should head immediately to visit before the opportunity may never come again. I will be sharing all about it on Saturday along with the winning spoon draw as drawn by Earl 🙂 Good luck again 🙂

      Reply

      • The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap
        Jan 25, 2013 @ 14:41:03

        Leeches?! Wow, you should collect them and donate to medicine. They’re still being used to help debride wounds. Understand being jaded when it comes to Government stuff and paying $2000!

        Oh good, we’ll see if the post shows up Saturday and we’ll see what good ole Earl comes up with. I’m tired. We have a dog who had eye surgery, inverted lids that were scratches her corneas and caused an abrasion and ulceration. We had to operate on both lids upper and lower bilateral. She’s in a collar and we have to keep one on one attention. My hubby is sleeping on the couch to babysit her. Time for zzzzzzzzzz. 🙂

  9. brymnsons
    Jan 25, 2013 @ 13:25:00

    Ah you see Fran that is why I have my small manageable dogs, oh those mop heads I hear you say. But they would lie in bed with me and commiserate for as long as it took. They would dutifully sigh in the right places and not insist that I get my lazy bum out of bed, that would be mum in my head 😀

    Reply

    • narf77
      Jan 25, 2013 @ 14:03:29

      I think it might be a bit too late to get me some of those smallun’s don’t you? ;). Mine sprint around on the bed as if they are in a horse race, bouncing on anything soft (usually me) and slobbering at will on any exposed bare bits…not fun at 5am I can tell you! 😉

      Reply

  10. foodnstuff
    Jan 25, 2013 @ 18:24:42

    Thanks for the kind words and I have a new subscriber as a result. The seeds are on their way and I have put some fenugreek in as well.

    Reply

    • narf77
      Jan 25, 2013 @ 19:22:35

      Cheers Bev, and you deserve the kind words, you are one of my go-to places to learn about approachable permaculture…no bollocks, just good solid facts and I am really glad that one of my dear constant readers has subscribed because they will get a wealth of information from your excellent site 🙂

      Reply

  11. Hannah (BitterSweet)
    Jan 26, 2013 @ 14:29:15

    Ah, such sweet creatures you share your home with! These photos really do bring out their personalities, and man, what a couple of characters you have on your hands. 😉

    Reply

  12. brymnsons
    Jan 26, 2013 @ 23:41:20

    You could try soaking them in hot water 😀

    Reply

  13. thinkingcowgirl
    Jan 26, 2013 @ 23:51:24

    I know you’re too hot, but think of us in the freezing dampness and enjoy!! Tonight I will dream of walking down that tree lined drive in the warmth, looking at the lovely agapanthus while clutching an iced smoothy to cool me down a tad. I will be wearing not very much, instead of the 6 layers I had on yesterday – actually I got a bit hot in the cinema, our local Rebel 😉 – saw Quartet, it was very funny and moving if you get a chance.

    I’m incredibly impressed with your fruit organisation…

    Actually, to be honest I don’t like it too hot either…people used to say to me ‘you must love your job in the summer’ and I’d think about the sweat pouring, eyes squinting and head exploding and it was hard to explain….give me a cool day for gardening, that’s the best. I can see why you’d get up early. Sometimes when it was very hot here (not often!) I’d start work at 6.30 and go home at 11, then go out again at 5 to do a couple of hours. Siesta, it’s the way forward 😉

    Reply

    • narf77
      Jan 27, 2013 @ 05:32:25

      Only a fellow gardener could know the “joys” of gardening in the middle of the day when everyone else was watching you from behind air conditioned windows…here in Tasmania we have the dubious “honour” of living under the hole in the ozone layer. As such, the sun has an intensity to it that I haven’t felt anywhere else. I lived in Western Australia and THAT was hot! I remember it getting to 49C and my gran’s budgie dying of heatstroke one year. It never gets that hot here but if you stand in the sun for a bit you really know how easy it is to get a sunburn. I take photos of Serendipity Farm and wonder if the camera is seeing the same vista that I am! I look at the picture and I look at the actuality of the place and all I see is dry sepia curling photographs of past glory! The camera lies…not only does it put 10kg on your bum, it makes everything in the garden look prettier ;). That fruit was a total and utter bargain! I am not much of a fruit lover but those mangoes are scrumptious and at $1 each for enormous great things, I felt positively rich discovering them. Steve would actually like to wander about Serendipity Farm with a drink in his hands as well but not a smoothie, more like something hard. He is on the wagon to give his liver a bit of a detox at the moment but that doesn’t stop his brain from wanting to roam ;). Quartet? We will keep our eyes open for it 🙂 You can walk around Serendipity Farm in the nude if you like. No-one can see you because my hermit dad allowed the foliage to grow so tall that there are very few places that you can even see a house…1 is about 5km away around the bay and that’s only a teeny little bit of roof and deck (and you would have to be doing some sort of extreme nude pole dancing on the deck rail to be even glimpsed…) and out in the river. I figure if the boat owners are silly enough to drop anchor and stare at our place with binoculars they deserve what they get! ;). It is so ironic that you are lusting after hot weather and I am lusting after cold. I long for my morning ritual of stoking Brunhilda from her overnight coaly slumber with some sticks and some dry wood… I love listening to her crackle with joy as the rain falls down and I adore knowing that I am safe and warm in my little patch of the world. I love to bake and winter is full of all sorts of wonderful possibilities and I plan on getting stuck into reviving Herman and making him my biotch! Have a great day and know that your summer is as close as our winter and that pretty soon we will both be whinging about what we currently lust after 😉

      Reply

      • The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap
        Jan 27, 2013 @ 05:56:55

        Do you know what happens that makes the camera lie? I have often wondered about that.

        This is lovely writing. Reminiscent of reading Thoreau and his love for nature. Just saying…

        I’m staying tuned to see if I get a new post. 🙂

      • narf77
        Jan 27, 2013 @ 06:29:01

        I already posted it last night (our time)…looks like it isn’t going to be delivered…I wonder why? It’s not in your spam folder is it? I know I sometimes waffle on and it might be seen as “spam” of sorts ;). Sorry you didn’t win the spoon…it will soon be mothers day here in Australia and another spoon giveaway so stay tuned 🙂

      • The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap
        Jan 27, 2013 @ 07:34:40

        I updated from my Reader to get yours daily and haven’t received anything new from yesterday. I’m only getting comments back and forth from posts I’ve posted on. I have no idea what else to do. I sure have enjoyed all your posts and your sweet life at Serendipity. I’ll try hitting follow again and reset it for daily and see what happens. If I don’t show up please know I tried and glad for this connection whenever. 🙂 p.s. congrats to whoever won that wonderful spoon. 🙂

      • narf77
        Jan 27, 2013 @ 07:42:10

        A lady in Oklahoma “Little Sundog” won the spoon but there will be another draw on Mothers Day (coming up soon in Australia) so you will get another chance at getting one of Steve’s lovely handmade spoons. Fingers crossed about you getting the posts :). I post every Wednesday and Saturday our time (we are generally a day ahead of you guys) so you could go hunting for posts if you don’t get them on your Wednesday and Saturday 🙂

      • The Persecution of Mildred Dunlap
        Jan 27, 2013 @ 13:13:13

        I like “Littlesundog’s” site. She’s got such a sweet face. Congrats on winning the spoon. I’ll keep this post in my in-box to remind me. Now to remember to look at it. I need sign posts for all things technical. No kidding.

        Thanks for you kindness. 🙂

      • narf77
        Jan 27, 2013 @ 14:16:27

        Down here in the blogosphere we are all kind :). We help each other out but in the case of technology… it would be more like the blind leading the blind! 😉

      • rabidlittlehippy
        Jan 27, 2013 @ 14:06:31

        Oh I look forward to stoking my sister of Brunhilda, Ms Ignisa, getting her ready for some cooking and heating and water heating and baking. I love to bake too and I’ve been profoundly grateful for the few cold evenings we’ve ad where 6*C is cold enough to light her up. 😀
        Looking forward to seeing your wildlife denying garden borders in action and I can’t wait to sit and smirk at the rotten little buggers trying in van to break IN to the Alcatraz your garden will end up as. It sounds well awesome!

      • narf77
        Jan 27, 2013 @ 14:24:47

        The only problem is, at the moment, both the native scarfmonkies and I can’t get in! We both stand on the outside looking in too intimidated to try! My tomatoes are ripening nicely and I am too scared to venture in (with all of the calisthenics needed to contort myself into those small spaces)…sigh…I am going to have to make myself a “Harvesting cup”! ;). Brunhilda has been steaming a Christmas pudding that we got before Christmas and it has been too hot to steam for 2 hours (we can give Glad next door back her enamel bowl now 😉 ), cooking some lentils for lentil hummus (forgot to soak the chickpeas), warming the basking dogs that have taken up residence on the hearth like it was winter yesterday and boiling kettles, heating hot water etc. and generally making me smile a whole lot :). Off to make Steve a sticky date pudding for his birthday dessert tonight (to go with his chosen evening meal of chicken curry and fried rice! Go figure these ex-pats and their weird desires! 😉 ).

      • rabidlittlehippy
        Jan 27, 2013 @ 17:41:01

        NOTHING weird about sticky date pudding! And Happy Birthday Steve!
        Sending thoughts of wire doors or a nice gift of a free screen door for your fortifications to allow easy HUMAN access (might need to add a deadbolt to keep out your veggie predators.
        We have a guest staying the night with us so Ignisa may well be fired up tonight and it IS going to be cold in the morning so… 😉 You sorta hafta with guests don’t you?

      • narf77
        Jan 27, 2013 @ 18:24:33

        Yup…Guests require Ignisa’s and Brunhilda’s attention post haste! 🙂 Have a great evening with your guests and here’s to Ignisa doing you proud 🙂

  14. Allotment adventures with Jean
    Jan 27, 2013 @ 06:35:28

    Another thoroughly interesting post Fran. Gives a real insight into your corner of Tassie. Lovely photographs. I wondered how you were going to eat seven kilos of bananas before they went bad. Freeze them, Of course. Don’t they go black? I love your friends netted veggie garden. A lot of effort (and expense probably) but worth it if you don’t want your hard work going to waste.

    Reply

    • narf77
      Jan 27, 2013 @ 06:44:27

      If you peel them they don’t Jean. They are just like little frozen soldiers all waiting to be thrown into my breakfast green smoothie :). That beautiful blueness of our friends garden comes from an old tennis net that had been languishing in her father in laws shed from an adventitious find that was going to be thrown out. Her partner did all of the work (as a result of one of their regular explosive fights…she always gets wonderful things when he wants to make up 😉 ) and I am SO envious of it! You need to understand Tasmanian possums and wallabies…they are made of stern stuff! They are clever and are able to work things out. I still have possums tunnelling their way under the netting that I put on top of our own veggie garden beds to wave their questing little arms through the bird netting and pinch everything green (or if they are lucky, tomato like…) as far as their rotten little arms will reach)…without something like our friends enclosed space, the odds of being actually able to harvest most of what you grow are nil. We lost most of our green beans this year to both wallabies (eating the leaves and beans that grew outside the bird netting) and possums on top grabbing everything else. There is a bean cube of vegetation a foot in on all sides of our bean enclosure :(. We are going to be making a HUGE circus tent of an enclosure using as much ex-fish farm netting as I can source so that we will be able to grow, harvest AND eat what we plant. Wasting water on feeding the natives isn’t my idea of fun!

      Reply

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